Newly impeached Donald finally 'unequivocally' condemns violence and ...

President Donald delivered another taped video address to the nation Wednesday following his impeachment in the House over 'incitement of insurrection' – where he repeatedly denounced violence following the MAGA riot in the Capitol.

His pre-taped comment came after Democrats repeatedly accused him of causing the riot that left six dead and the Capitol vandalized. 

Ten House Republicans joined in voting 232-197 for a House impeachment article – setting up a Senate trial even after leaves office – something he only belatedly acknowledged he would do.

spoke straight to the camera, as he did in a previous video where he acknowledged last week for the first time that there would be a transition in power hours after his supporters invaded the Capitol and clashed with Capitol Police, leaving one officer dead. Another committed suicide after the events.

This time, didn't tweet out the statement, because Twitter has blocked his account after the Capitol riot that killed five. The president said the riot 'angered and appalled millions of Americans across the political spectrum.'

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'I want to be very clear. I unequivocally condemn the violence that we saw last week,' said, clearly reading from a prompter.

'Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country – and no place in our movement.'

His appeal came amid warnings from law enforcement of further violence during the handover on January 20 – and grave threats to his own political future through impeachment. The Senate is not only moving ahead with a trial, but will vote to bar from holding future office if he is convicted.

His statements were unequivocal – but followed a series of public comments in the past where he made statements that could be seen to justify violence with a wink. He has told police 'Please, don't be too nice' when making arrests, and tweeted after the start of George Floyd protests that 'when the looting starts the shooting starts.'

His audience members have jeered at protesters and media members at his campaign rallies for years, as told his supporters to 'get them out of here' when ever a demosntrator interrupted.

defended his movement, after rioters decked out in gear were seen fighting with police, and even beating officers with American flags.

Address: Trump issued a speech delivered from a teleprompter at the Resolute Desk, in which he said 'unequivocally' condemned violence and  was'shocked at the calamity at the Capitol' - the opposite of accounts of him watching transfixed and being unwilling to call it off as it happened. He did not mention his impeachment which Nancy Pelosi signed off on as the speech emerged

Address: issued a speech delivered from a teleprompter at the Resolute Desk, in which he said 'unequivocally' condemned violence and  was'shocked at the calamity at the Capitol' - the opposite of accounts of him watching transfixed and being unwilling to call it off as it happened. He did not mention his impeachment which Nancy Pelosi signed off on as the speech emerged

It comes to this: Trump had to use the official White House account to issue his speech after being banned from Twitter. It is unclear whether this will be seen as a breach of the Twitter rules which prevent him from posting on accounts he controls

It comes to this: had to use the official White House account to issue his speech after being banned from Twitter. It is unclear whether this will be seen as a breach of the Twitter rules which prevent him from posting on accounts he controls

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MAGA mob: Trump did not use the speech to acknowledge any responsibility for the desecration of the Capitol for which he is being impeached, but came closer than  before by saying to his supporters of violence and lawbreaking: 'If you do any of this you do not support our movement.'

MAGA mob: did not use the speech to acknowledge any responsibility for the desecration of the Capitol for which he is being impeached, but came closer than  before by saying to his supporters of violence and lawbreaking: 'If you do any of this you do not support our movement.'

'Making America Great Again has always been about defending the rule of law, supporting the men and women of law enforcement and upholding our nation's most sacred traditions and values,' said , who made 'law and order' and overriding theme of his campaign,' he said.

'Mob violence goes against everything I believe in and everything our movement stands for,' said . Lawmakers have combed over his January 6 speech, where he told supporters to 'fight' and urged them to march for the Capitol to protest an election result he called 'rigged' while Congress was meeting to count the electoral votes.'

'No true supporter of mine could ever endorse political violence, no true supporter of mine could ever disrespect law enforcement or our great American flag,' said . 'No true supporter of mine could ever threaten or harass their fellow Americans. If you do any of these things you are not supporting our movement, you are attacking it, and you are attacking our country,' he added.

'We cannot tolerate it. We have seen political violence spiral out of control.'

also tried to connect the violence committed by his supporters to violence and vandalism at protests this summer – a tactic his supporters also used on the floor in his defense.

'We have seen too many riots, too many mobs, too many acts of intimidation and destruction. Whether you are on the right or the left, a Democrat or a Republican, there is never a justification for violence. No excuses, no exceptions. America is a nation of laws,' said.

'Those who engaged in the attacks last week will be brought to justice,' he said – with hundreds of law enforcement officers opening hundreds of cases to try to bring perpetrators to justice.

In the wake of the riots, an estimated 20,000 National Guard are being deployed in the Capitol, the Capitol is surrounded by a tall fence, and officials are warning of the potential for further violence.    

The video came hours after a statement sent from the White House as the impeachment debate was taking place. 

'In light of reports of more demonstrations, I urge that there must be NO violence, NO lawbreaking and NO vandalism of any kind. That is not what I stand for, and it is not what America stands for. I call on ALL Americans to help ease tensions and calm tempers. Thank You,' the statement read. 

The White House blasted the statement out to its press list after Twitter, Facebook and Instagram froze 's social media accounts for inciting violence. Spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany also tweeted it from her official press secretary account and the campaign texted it to followers.

The statement contained several words in ALL CAPS - which was a regular feature of 's tweets.

on had Tuesday denied all responsibility for last week's riot, saying his fiery speech to his supporters before they marched on the Capitol was 'totally appropriate.' 

In his first public remarks since Wednesday's MAGA storming of the Capitol, the president slammed Democrats, accusing them of creating 'tremendous danger' with their attempt to remove him from office but said repeatedly he wanted 'no violence.'

The president defended his speech at a rally on ellipse, where he encouraged his thousands of supporters to 'march' on the Capitol. 

They did so, leaving five dead and a path of destruction in their wake in the form of busted windows, broken furniture and destroyed office space. Dozens have now been rounded up by police and FBI.

'If you read my speech - and many people have done it and I've seen it both in the papers and in the media, on television, it is been analyzed - and people thought that what I said was totally appropriate,' he said as he boarded Air Force One to head for Alamo, Texas, on the Mexican border, to inspect his wall.

'They've analyzed my speech and my words and my final paragraph, my final sentence and everybody to a tee thought it was totally appropriate,' he continued. He offered no indication of who 'they' are.

also denounced the Democrats' efforts to remove him from office, which has been joined by some Republicans, to remove him from office - and called it a 'danger,' not his supporters' actions.

But, he said he wanted no violence from his supporters. reportedly had initially enjoyed the sight of his supporters on Capitol Hill last week, fighting for him to illegally take a second term in the White House. He changed his tune and called on them to stand down when he warned he could be held legally responsible for their actions.

'We want no violence, never violence. We want absolutely no violence,' he said repeatedly Tuesday before he left for Texas to tout the completion of a section of his border wall.

'And on the impeachment, it's really a continuation of the greatest witch hunt in the history of politics. It's ridiculous. It's absolutely ridiculous. This impeachment is causing tremendous anger,' he said.

He denounced Democratic leaders but made no mention of the Republicans who have called on him to leave office.

'It's really a terrible thing that they're doing for Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer to continue on this path. I think it's causing tremendous danger to our country, and it's causing tremendous anger, I want no violence,' he said.

That calculus appeared however to have changed with the new video, issued after the House voted 232-197 to impeach him for a second time for 'incitement of insurrection,' exactly a week after the MAGA mob stormed Capitol Hill.

The Democratic majority was joined by 10 Republicans, making the House's move bipartisan - unlike 's first impeachment less than 13 months ago.  

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that he would not bring the Senate back before January 19, the day before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration. It means that cannot be removed from office before he leaves anyway. 

HOUSE REPUBLICANS WHO VOTED 'YES' ON IMPEACHMENT

Liz Cheney - Wyoming. Republican royalty and House Number 3

'There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.' 

Adam Kinzinger - Illinois. Outspoken critic and Air Force veteran

'If these actions are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?'

John Katko - New York. Holds swing district and co-chairs moderate group

'To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy.' 

Fred Upton - Michigan. 14-term rep who co-chairs moderate group 

'It is time to say: Enough is enough.'

Jaime Herrera Beutler  - Washington

Five-term rep in deep blue state 

'The President of the United States incited a riot. That riot led to five deaths.' 

Dan Newhouse - Washington

One of only two GOP reps from state 

'Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republican is not an option.' 

Peter Meijer - Michigan 

Holds Gerald Ford's seat  

'There was no such courage from our President who betrayed and misled millions.' 

Tom Rice - South Carolina 

Still to explain vote 

Anthony Gonzalez  - Ohio 

'The President of the United States helped organize and incite a mob that attacked the United States Congress in an attempt to prevent us from completing our solemn duties.'

Former NFL starting wide receiver 

David Valadao - California 

'His inciting rhetoric was un-American, abhorrent, and absolutely an impeachable offense. It’s time to put country over politics.' 

Reclaimed district from Dems in 2020

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McConnell's move was revealed as the House debated the impeachment article. Then he added to the drama with a statement suggesting he could convict, saying: 'While the press has been full of speculation, I have not made a final decision on how I will vote and I intend to listen to the legal arguments when they are presented to the Senate.' 

Just before he entered history as the first president to be impeached twice, the White House put out a statement from , which called for peace but did not address his impeachment.

'In light of reports of more demonstrations, I urge that there must be NO violence, NO lawbreaking and NO vandalism of any kind. That is not what I stand for, and it is not what America stands for. I call on ALL Americans to help ease tensions and calm tempers. Thank You,' the president's statement said. 

Later, after the impeachment vote, put out a video message.  

The call for calm did nothing to quell a Republican rebellion against him, led by the House number three Liz Cheney, which ended with a total of 10 GOP members voting to impeach .

Halfway through the debate another defiant Republican, Rep. Dan Newhouse of Washington, said: 'Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republic is not an option.

'A vote against impeachment is a vote to validate this unacceptable violence we witnessed in our nation's capital. It is also a vote to condone President 's inaction. He did not strongly condemn the attack nor did he call in reinforcements when our officers were overwhelmed.' 

'Our country needed a leader and President failed to fulfill his oath of office,' Newhouse added. His floor speech got Democratic applause.

The 10 votes make the impeachment the most bipartisan ever, another historical marker which also creates a deep split in the Republican party which is unlikely to end with 's departure. 

The vote ended with Nancy Pelosi, the House Speaker, in the chair, declaring the count of 232 to 197 - but with silence from the Democrats and handful of Republicans still present. Pelosi had warned her members not to celebrate the outcome.

 'We're heartbroken over what this means to our country,' Pelosi said at the engrossment ceremony for the article of impeachment that took place Wednesday evening. 'To have a president who incites insurrection.' 

She said she 'sadly' signed the documents.  

It concluded a day of debate in which Pelosi had called a 'clear and present danger,' as Democrats said they were standing in a 'crime scene' and demanded that pay a price for a campaign of 'lies and conspiracy theories' which had fomented violence.  

's Republican allies did not defend 's behavior, but instead pitched censuring the president or launching a 9/11-style commission, more fitting punishments they argued for someone who was already leaving office. 

Rep. Chip Roy, a Texas Republican, went as far to say 's conduct was impeachable, but wouldn't vote for the article, calling it 'flawed.'  

The Republican revolt was led by Cheney, the number three in the caucus and party royalty as the daughter of the former vice president Dick Cheney.

She had issued a fiery denunciation of when she announced her vote 24 hours earlier, saying he 'lit the flame on insurrection' but did not speak on the floor.

In the Senate, which will have to hold a trial of in the wake of the vote as soon as it receives the article, McConnell's announcement that he is willing to convict raises new questions about how Republicans will vote when the trial happens.

So far only Sen. Mitt Romney appears certain to back conviction, while on Wednesday Sen. Lindsey Graham accused McConnell of risking more violence by backing impeachment. No other Republican senator has made their position public. 

Impeachment is by a two-thirds majority of the Senate, which in principle means the 50 Democrats have to be joined by 17 Republicans, but in fact it is only a majority of those present, meaning some GOP members could stay away to let a vote go through without actively taking part.  

In a statement, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer continued to push McConnell to reconvene the Senate sooner - but said there would be a trial no matter what.

'A Senate trial can begin immediately, with agreement from the current Senate Majority Leader to reconvene the Senate for an emergency session, or it will begin after January 19th,' Schumer said. 

'But make no mistake, there will be an impeachment trial in the United States Senate; there will be a vote on convicting the president for high crimes and misdemeanors; and if the president is convicted, there will be a vote on barring him from running again.' 

Bringing down the hammer: Nancy Pelosi gavels the end of the voting and declares that Donald Trump has been impeached again 232-197 - 10 of the majority votes coming from Republicans

Bringing down the hammer: Nancy Pelosi gavels the end of the voting and declares that Donald has been impeached again 232-197 - 10 of the majority votes coming from Republicans

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signs the article of impeachment against President Donald Trump at an engrossment ceremony after the vote Wednesday night

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signs the article of impeachment against President Donald at an engrossment ceremony after the vote Wednesday night 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi holds up the article of impeachment after signing it at an engrossment ceremony Wednesday night on Capitol Hill

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi holds up the article of impeachment after signing it at an engrossment ceremony Wednesday night on Capitol Hill 

The article of impeachment against President Donald Trump sits on a table before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at an engrossment ceremony after Wednesday's vote

The article of impeachment against President Donald sits on a table before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at an engrossment ceremony after Wednesday's vote 

Photographers lean over the article of impeachment Wednesday on Capitol Hill trying to get a good shot before an engrossment ceremony with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi

Photographers lean over the article of impeachment Wednesday on Capitol Hill trying to get a good shot before an engrossment ceremony with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi 

Republican House number three Liz Cheney (right) led 10 of the House GOP into voting for impeachment - but is now facing a backlash from Trump ultra-loyalists. She was see n speaking to Jamie Raskin, one of the key Democrats pushing for Trump's impeachment and removal

Republican House number three Liz Cheney (right) led 10 of the House GOP into voting for impeachment - but is now facing a backlash from ultra-loyalists. She was see n speaking to Jamie Raskin, one of the key Democrats pushing for 's impeachment and removal 

READ THE FULL ARTICLE OF IMPEACHMENT 

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IMPEACHMENT TIMETABLE

Wednesday afternoon: House passed single Article

What happens next? Nancy Pelosi decides when to transmit Article to Senate. When she does, it must begin trial on the next sitting day and sit six days a week until it concludes 

Tuesday January 19:  Earliest date Mitch McConnell has said Senate can begin considering Article. Senate procedures may mean trial will not begin until the following day at 1pm

Wednesday January 20, noon: leaves office

What happens next? If a trial is under way, it can continue. Most legal experts say if it has not begun, it can, but there is a minority who say impeachment cannot continue if the president is not in office

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Rep. Tom Cole, the first GOP lawmaker to speak, argued against a hasty impeachment vote 'not because of the president's inappropriate and reckless words are deserving of defense but because the presidency itself demands due process.' Cole had himself voted to overturn the election results.

Republicans also warned impeaching for a second time would only make partisan hostilities worse.  

'This is a reckless impeachment,' complained Republican Rep. Jason Smith of Missouri. 'This will only bring up the hate and fire more than ever before.' 

Republican Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona charged Democrats with wanting 'complete destruction of your nemesis.'

'Instead of stopping the train, his movement will go stronger, for you would have made him a martyr,' Biggs warned. 

Democrats described the terror of last week's attack. 

'We are debating this resolution at an actual crime scene and we wouldn't be here if not for the president of the United States,' said Rep. Jim McGovern, a Massachusetts Democrat.

'People were sending text messages to their loved ones, telling them they loved them. They thought they were saying goodbye,' he added.  

Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin, the House's lead impeachment manager, referred to the rioters as a 'bloodthirsty mob.'   

'They wounded dozens of people, hospitalizing dozens of people,' he said. 'They may have been hunting for Pence and Pelosi to stage their coup, but every one of us in this room right now, could have died.'

Rep. Joaquin Castro echoed Raskin's description. 

'Let me ask you a question? What do you think they would have done if they had gotten in? What do you think they would have done to you? And who do you think sent them here?' he asked his fellow members. 'The most dangerous man to ever occupy the Oval Office.' 

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, speaking to an InstagramLive audience Tuesday night since she was proxy voting, said, 'I can tell you that I had a very close encounter where I thought I was going to die.' 

'I did not know if I was going to make it to the end of that day alive,' the high-profile progressive lawmaker said.  

On the floor Wednesday, the Democrats pointed to the Republicans' high-profile defection: the No. 3 House Republican, Cheney. 

Cheney, the Republican Conference Chair, laced into in her statement, saying he 'lit the flame' of insurrection - and Democrats repeated her words back to the Republicans. 

The House's No. 3 Democrat, Rep. Jim Clyburn, walks into the Capitol Building surrounded by members of the National Guard

The House's No. 3 Democrat, Rep. Jim Clyburn, walks into the Capitol Building surrounded by members of the National Guard 

Armed National Guard troops are seen outside the U.S. Capitol Building as members inside debate impeaching President Donald Trump for a second time in 13 months

Armed National Guard troops are seen outside the U.S. Capitol Building as members inside debate impeaching President Donald for a second time in 13 months

Republican Rep. Jim Jordan, a top Trump ally, speaks on the House floor Wednesday as impeachment proceedings began

Republican Rep. Jim Jordan, a top ally, speaks on the House floor Wednesday as impeachment proceedings began 

HOUSE REPUBLICANS WHO VOTED 'YES' ON IMPEACHMENT

Liz Cheney - Wyoming. Republican royalty and House Number 3

'There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.' 

Adam Kinzinger - Illinois. Outspoken critic and Air Force veteran

'If these actions are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?'

John Katko - New York. Holds swing district and co-chairs moderate group

'To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy.' 

Fred Upton - Michigan. 14-term rep who co-chairs moderate group 

'It is time to say: Enough is enough.'

Jaime Herrera Beutler  - Washington

Five-term rep in deep blue state 

'The President of the United States incited a riot. That riot led to five deaths.' 

Dan Newhouse - Washington

One of only two GOP reps from state 

'Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republican is not an option.' 

Peter Meijer - Michigan 

Holds Gerald Ford's seat  

'There was no such courage from our President who betrayed and misled millions.' 

Tom Rice - South Carolina 

Still to explain vote 

Anthony Gonzalez  - Ohio 

'The President of the United States helped organize and incite a mob that attacked the United States Congress in an attempt to prevent us from completing our solemn duties.'

Former NFL starting wide receiver 

David Valadao - California 

'His inciting rhetoric was un-American, abhorrent, and absolutely an impeachable offense. It’s time to put country over politics.' 

Reclaimed district from Dems in 2020

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'There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution,' she said.

The decision to back impeachment by Cheney, a member of Republican royalty as the daughter of Dick Cheney, and seen as a future contender for the party's House leadership and the Speaker's chair, means that impeachment would be bipartisan.  

On the floor Wednesday, Democrats pointed to Cheney's statement as evidence they were in the right. 

The Democrats' No. 2, Rep. Steny Hoyer, recited Cheney's words during his turn to speak. 

'That is not some irresponsible new member of Congress of the United States,' Hoyer said. 'This is the daughter of the former Republican whip and former vice president of the United States of America.' 

'She knows of which she speaks,' Hoyer argued. 

Cheney never gave her own floor speech.  

Reps. Jim Jordan and Paul Gosar, two of 's top GOP House allies, were pushing to have Cheney removed from her leadership position. 

JIM JORDAN SAYS DEMOCRATS WANT TO 'CANCEL' THE PRESIDENT 

Jordan gave two fiery floor speeches Wednesday.   

He yelled '19 minutes!' into the microphone Wednesday afternoon, charging Democrats with waiting just 19 minutes into the administration to start their impeachment hunt.   

He said Democrats were pursuing removal again because of 'politics and the fact that they want to, they want to cancel the president.' 

'This is about getting the president of the United States,' Jordan said. 

'They spied on his campaign before he was elected, 19 minutes into his presidency they started the impeachment push, three year Mueller investigation, 19 lawyers, 40 agents, 500 witnesses, 2,500 subpoenas, $40 million to find nothing,' Jordan went on. 

The Ohio Republican said impeachment 'round one' was based on information from a 'biased' whistleblower. 

'Now it's impeachment round two,' he said. 'It's always been about getting the president, no matter what. It's an obsession, an obsession that's now broadened. It's not just about impeachment anymore it's about canceling ... canceling the president,' Jordan argued. 

'IT BREAKS MY HEART' SAYS HOUSE SPEAKER NANCY PELOSI 

Pelosi, who opened the formal impeachment articles debate, said she wasn't pursuing the measure with glee. 

'It gives me no pleasure to say this, it breaks my heart. It should break your heart. It should break all of our hearts,' the top Democrat said. 

Pelosi encouraged the Senate to act, calling the president a 'clear and present danger.' 

'I believe the president must be convicted by the Senate, a constitutional  remedy that will ensure that the republic will be safe from this man, that was so resolutely determined to tear down the things that we hold dear, and hold us together,' she said.  

She also slammed those who engaged in the riot. 

'Those insurrectionists were not patriots. They were not part of a political base to be catered to and managed. They were domestic terrorists and justice must prevail,' the House speaker said. 

TOP HOUSE REPUBLICAN SAYS ANTIFA NOT RESPONSIBLE 

Pelosi's Republican counterpart, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, let other, more pro- members speak before he took a turn on the floor, where he cleared up some right-wing misinformation. 

'Some say the riots were caused by Antifa,' McCarthy said. 'There is absolutely no evidence of that. And conservatives should be the first to say so,' he advised. 

McCarthy said he planned to vote no on impeachment because it was too hasty. 

'I believe impeaching the president in such a short timeframe would be a mistake,' McCarthy argued. 'No investigations have been completed. No hearings have been held.'  

'What's more, the Senate has confirmed that no trial will begin until after President-Elect Biden is sworn in,' McCarthy added, a nod to the breaking McConnell news. 

'S TOP ALLIES POINT FINGERS BACK AT DEMOCRATS 

Most of the Republicans lining up to speak were hard-liners - and pointed to what they considered to be Democratic hypocrisy. 

'The left in America has incited far more political violence than the right for months. Our cities burned police stations burned or businesses were shattered. And they said nothing,' Rep. Matt Gaetz yelled. 

'Well they lit actual flames. Actual fires,' Gaetz exclaimed. 

That comment cued boos from the Democratic side.  

Rep. Ken Buck compared the capitol assault to administration officials being harassed at restaurants. 

'The press secretary Sarah Sanders was kicked out of a restaurant for being a employee, the DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen harassed at her home,' Buck said on the floor. 

Nielsen was confronted by a crowd at a D.C. restaurant over the administration's child separation policy.

Rep. Lauren Boebert, who has openly supported the QAnon conspiracy theory, called for 'accountability on the left.'

'After encouraging and normalizing violence,' she said. 

'I call bull crap when I hear the Democrats demanding unity. Sadly they are only unified in hate,' she blasted.   

the other 'QAnon congresswoman,' Rep. Marjorie Taylor Green gave her floor remarks wearing a 'CENSORED' mask.

Rep. Brian Mast, a Florida Republican, used a dramatic pause to make his point. 

'Has any one of those individuals who brought violence on this capitol been brought here to answer whether they did that because of our president?' Mast asked. 

He stood unanswered for 30 seconds until his time elapsed. 'It appears I will receive no answer,' he said.

Rep. Dan Newhouse, a Republican from Washington state, became the sixth GOP member to say he would vote to impeach President Donald Trump

Rep. Dan Newhouse, a Republican from Washington state, became the sixth GOP member to say he would vote to impeach President Donald  

(SOME) REPUBLICANS REVOLT 

Joining Cheney in voting for the Democratic-prepared article of impeachment was Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, John Katko of New York,  Fred Upton of Michigan,  Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington, Rep. Dan Newhouse of Washington,  Peter Meijer of Michigan, Tom Rice of South Carolina and Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio.  

'My vote to impeach our sitting president is not a fear-based decision,' Herrera Beutler said during her floor speech. 'I am not choosing a side I am choosing, it's the only way to defeat fear.'   

Newhouse announced Wednesday mid-debate that he would vote yes on impeachment. 

'Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republic is not an option,' Newhouse said.

'A vote against impeachment is a vote to validate this unacceptable violence we witnessed in our nation's capital,' Newhouse said in a statement. 'It is also a vote to condone President 's inaction. He did not strongly condemn the attack nor did he call in reinforcements when our officers were overwhelmed.' 

'Our country needed a leader and President failed to fulfill his oath of office,' Newhouse added. 

His remarks were applauded on the House floor.

Cheney's decision came minutes after McConnell was revealed to believe that had committed impeachable offenses.

The New York Times' bombshell was still echoing in Washington D.C. when the House started its 25th Amendment debate - and as it dragged to a close Tuesday night, Axios reported that McConnell was leaning towards a vote to convict the president and was 'more than 50/50' on it.  

Cheney was seen speaking to Raskin on Tuesday night as he led the Democrats arguing for a resolution urging Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment removing from power.

The House passed it late Tuesday despite Pence sending a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi saying he'll refuse. 

Hundreds of National Guard troops wer sleeping on the stone floor of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning as security in Washington intensified a week out from Joe Biden's inauguration

Hundreds of National Guard troops wer sleeping on the stone floor of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning as security in Washington intensified a week out from Joe Biden's inauguration 

The troops could be seen spreading out inside the Rotunda of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning

The troops could be seen spreading out inside the Rotunda of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning

The troops cradled their weapons and huddled together as they slept inside the Capitol on Wednesday

The troops cradled their weapons and huddled together as they slept inside the Capitol on Wednesday 

In a vote that wrapped up around 11.30pm Tuesday, the House voted 223-205 to approve the resolution, which can't actually force the vice president's hand.   

'I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our Nation or consistent with the Constitution,' Pence said in his letter to Pelosi, refusing to pull the trigger on the 25th. 

'Last week, I did not yield to pressure to exert beyond my constitutional authority to determine the outcome of the election, and I will not now yield to efforts in the House of Representatives to play political games at a time so serious in the life of our Nation,' Pence added. 

Pence's letter came as the House was holding procedural votes on the resolution.   

No Republicans joined on until the final vote - with Rep. Adam Kinzinger joining Democrats in the push to have Pence to use the 25th.  

ultra-loyalist Jim Jordan says he will try to oust Liz Cheney from her position as party's House number three in revenge for voting to impeach president 

Jim Jordan said he wanted Republicans to remove Rep. Liz Cheney from her leadership position over her push to impeach President Donald

'I think she's, I think she's totally wrong,' Jordan said. 'The conference should have a second vote on that,' the Ohio Republican told reporters, saying he believed lawmakers should get a say on removing Cheney from her No. 3 position. 

Republican Rep. Paul Gosar, another top ally, was circulating a petition to GOP members pushing for Cheney's removal, C-SPAN and CNN reported.   

The House Republican caucus held leadership elections for the 117th Congress on November 17, two weeks after Election Day. 

Cheney, again, was selected to be the Republican Conference chairman, and ran for the position unopposed. 

On Tuesday she announced she would side the the Democratic majority and vote to impeach for 'incitement of insurrection.' 

In an explosive statement, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney laced into saying he 'lit the flame' of insurrection. 

'There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution,' Cheney said.  

Four other GOP House members have said they will vote for 's impeachment: Reps. Adam Kinzinger, Fred Upton, John Katko and Jaime Herrera Beutler. 

Speaking to Capitol Hill reporters, Jordan was unsure if there was a mechanism to push a member out of leadership.

'I don't know about that - it's just where I'm at,' he told the press.   

When asked if the conservative Freedom Caucus, of which Jordan is a leader, was supportive of pushing Cheney out, Jordan replied sarcastically, 'What do you think?' 

'You know the answer. You know the answer to that question,' he went on. 'Of course.' 

Jordan was also asked if Republicans had a 'cohesive leaderhip team' with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Cheney appearing to be in direct conflict. 'Leader McCarthy and whip Scalise have done a great job,' Jordan answered.

Rep. Steve Scalise is the No. 2 Republican in the House of Representatives.  Jordan was recently given a Presidential Medal of Freedom behind closed doors by .  Both voted to overturn the election. 

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That set the scene for an impeachment debate and vote Wednesday entirely different from the first impeachment vote on October 31, 2019.

Then the only non-Democratic vote was from Justin Amash, who was essentially forced out of the Republican party before he even cast it.

But after a day in which they feared for their lives, the mood in Congress had changed rapidly.

LINDSEY GRAHAM IN BITTER PUBLIC SPLIT WITH MITCH MCCONNELL OVER IMPEACHMENT

Lindsey Graham slammed Mitch McConnell and other Republican leaders in the Senate on Wednesday as the House began debate to impeach President Donald a second time.

In a lengthy statement, delivered the day after Graham traveled to Texas with President to visit a new section of the border wall, the senator argued: 'The last thing the country needs is an impeachment trial of a president who is leaving office in one week.'

Graham, a staunch ally, warned another impeachment trial 'could invite further violence' and decried Democrats for wanting to do a 'do-over impeachment.'

Senator Lindsey Graham jumped back on the Trump plane - literally - on Tuesday as he accompanied the president on Air Force One to Texas

Senator Lindsey Graham jumped back on the plane - literally - on Tuesday as he accompanied the president on Air Force One to Texas

'The House impeachment process seeks to legitimize a snap impeachment totally void of due process. No hearings. No witnesses. It is a rushed process that, over time, will become a threat to future presidents. As to Senate leadership, I fear they are making the problem worse, not better,' he said. 

Graham jumped back on the plane - literally - on Tuesday as he accompanied the president on Air Force One to Texas.

Senator Lindsey Graham Statement 

'Supporting the impeachment of President under these circumstances will do great damage to the institutions of government and could invite further violence at a time the President is calling for calm. If there was a time for America's political leaders to bend a knee and ask for God's counsel and guidance, it is now. The most important thing for leaders to do in times of crisis is to make things better, not worse.

'The process being used in the House to impeach President is an affront to any concept of due process and will further divide the country. The President, who will be leaving office in less than a week, has committed to an orderly transfer of power, encouraging calm and rejecting violence.

'The House impeachment process seeks to legitimize a snap impeachment totally void of due process. No hearings. No witnesses. It is a rushed process that, over time, will become a threat to future presidents. As to Senate leadership, I fear they are making the problem worse, not better.

'The last thing the country needs is an impeachment trial of a president who is leaving office in one week.

'Democrats have already impeached the President once over a matter which was not worthy of that process. Now they seek to do it again, believing that this effort will wash for history the fact that the first impeachment was based on the thinnest of pretenses: a phone call with the leader of Ukraine. Impeachment should never be a 'do-over,' but that is what Democrats are seeking to do today.

'To my Republican colleagues who legitimize this process, you are doing great damage not only to the country, the future of the presidency, but also to the party. The millions who have supported President and his agenda should not be demonized because of the despicable actions of a seditious mob. The individuals who participated in the storming of the Capitol should be met with the full force of the law. They should and will be held accountable.'

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The trip comes after Graham broke with the president last Wednesday, refusing to join a -backed effort to contest Electoral College counts in the hours after the MAGA riot. 

'All I can say is count me out, enough is enough,' Graham told his Senate colleagues then. 'When it's over it is over.'   

But his tune changed.

Graham on Wednesday called out Republicans who are voting for impeachment. Ten Republican House members supported impeaching under the charge he violated his oath of office by inciting the mob of insurgents that attacked the Capitol on Wednesday.

'To my Republican colleagues who legitimize this process, you are doing great damage not only to the country, the future of the presidency, but also to the party,' Graham said. 

The House approved the articles of impeachment against on Wednesday afternoon, 232-197.

Republican leaders in the Senate were weighing whether to launch a trial on Friday to consider removing him from office, a source familiar with the deliberations told Reuters.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ruled it out.

'Given the rules, procedures, and Senate precedents that govern presidential impeachment trials, there is simply no chance that a fair or serious trial could conclude before President-elect Biden is sworn in next week. The Senate has held three presidential impeachment trials. They have lasted 83 days, 37 days, and 21 days respectively,' he said in a statement after the House vote.

'Even if the Senate process were to begin this week and move promptly, no final verdict would be reached until after President had left office. This is not a decision I am making; it is a fact. The President-elect himself stated last week that his inauguration on January 20 is the 'quickest' path for any change in the occupant of the presidency,' he noted.

He said the trial would begin after Biden took the oath of office. 

'In light of this reality, I believe it will best serve our nation if Congress and the executive branch spend the next seven days completely focused on facilitating a safe inauguration and an orderly transfer of power to the incoming Biden

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