Scott Morrison open to meeting Chinese president to mend months-long trade ...

Scott Morrison is prepared to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping to mend a tense trade dispute simmering between the countries for months but warned Australia would not make concessions.

The Prime Minister said Canberra and Beijing viewed their links as important for the prosperity and security of both nations, and should work out their differences.

'We will remain absolutely open and available to meet, to discuss, any of the issues that have been identified,' he said.

'But those discussions won't take place on the base of any sort of preemptive concessions on Australia's part on those matters.

China slapped an 80 per cent tariff on Australian barley back in June, harming producers

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China slapped an 80 per cent tariff on Australian barley back in June, harming producers

'I don't think that any Australian would want their Prime Minister to be conceding the points that they've set out.' 

'It's an important relationship, but it is a relationship that will be pursued on the basis of Australia's national interests, and without, in any way, compromising Australia's sovereignty.'

The PM also rejected arguments the Australia-China dispute was caused by decisions made by his government, saying relations were growing tense over a number of years. 

Outwardly, signs of Beijing's frustration with Australia was visible under the previous Turnbull government. 

After Australia banned Chinese tech giant Huawei from participating in constructing the country's 5G network amid espionage concerns, senior communist party officials reportedly refused to answer calls from Australian politicians and diplomats. 

The Australian coal export industry to china is worth $14billion a year (pictured: Newcastle port)

The Australian coal export industry to china is worth $14billion a year (pictured: Newcastle port) 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaking on Monday (pictured) said he was open to meeting his Chinese counterpart to repair a tense trade dispute

Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaking on Monday (pictured) said he was open to meeting his Chinese counterpart to repair a tense trade dispute 

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Foreign interference laws, widely regarded as aimed at China, also introduced that year further infuriated Beijing. 

However, Morrison's vocal push for an international inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020, eventually backed by 120 countries, caused tensions to reach boiling point. 

During the second half of the year China began targeting Australian exports one-by-one in economic retaliation. 

Beef, barley, lobster, wine, and coal were hit with measures such sky-high taxes - effectively banning Australian exports of the products. 

Towards the end of the year, the Chinese embassy in Canberra released a bizarre dossier of '14 grievances' outlining the issues Beijing has with Australia. 

'I know what the 14 points are; so does everyone else. If they are the conditions then it will be a while before we meet. But we are

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