Tehran names Natanz 'sabatuer'

Iran has named a suspect in the attack on its Natanz nuclear facility that damaged centrifuges there, saying he had fled the country 'hours before' the sabotage happened.

While the extent of the damage from the April 11 sabotage remains unclear, it comes as Iran tries to negotiate with world powers over allowing the U.S. to re-enter its tattered nuclear deal and lift the economic sanctions it faces.

Already, Iran has begun enriching uranium up to 60% purity in response - three times higher than ever before, though in small quantities. 

President Rouhani said the move, which takes the country closer than ever before to 90% enriched uranium needed to make a bomb, is intended as a direct response to the 'evil' Natanz attack last week - which Tehran blames on Israel. 

The sabotage and Iran's response to it have further inflamed tensions across the Mideast, where a shadow war between Tehran and Israel, the prime suspect in the sabotage, still rages.

Insurance Loans Mortgage Attorney Credit Lawyer

A portrait of a man identified as Reza Karimi alleged saboteur of the incident that damaged a centrifuge hall at the Natanz Uranium Enrichment Facility on Sunday, April 11, some 200 miles south of the capital Tehran

A portrait of a man identified as Reza Karimi alleged saboteur of the incident that damaged a centrifuge hall at the Natanz Uranium Enrichment Facility on Sunday, April 11, some 200 miles south of the capital Tehran

Various centrifuge machines line the hall damaged on Sunday, April 11, 2021, at the Natanz Uranium Enrichment Facility

Various centrifuge machines line the hall damaged on Sunday, April 11, 2021, at the Natanz Uranium Enrichment Facility

State television named the suspect as 43-year-old Reza Karimi. It showed a passport-style photograph of a man it identified as Karimi, saying he was born in the nearby city of Kashan, Iran.

The report also aired what appeared to be an Interpol 'red notice' seeking his arrest. The arrest notice was not immediately accessible on Interpol's public-facing database. Interpol, based in Lyon, France, declined to comment.

The TV report said 'necessary actions' are underway to bring Karimi back to Iran through legal channels, without elaborating. The supposed Interpol 'red notice' listed his foreign travel history as including Ethiopia, Kenya, the Netherlands, Qatar, Romania, Turkey, Uganda and the United Arab Emirates.

The report did not elaborate how Karimi would have gotten access to one of the most secure facilities in the Islamic Republic. However, it did for the first time show authorities acknowledging an explosion struck the Natanz facility.

There was a 'limited explosion of a small part of the electricity-feeding path to the centrifuges' hall,' the TV report said. 'The explosion happened because of the function of explosive materials and there was no cyberattack.'

Initial reports in Israeli media, which maintain close relations to its military and intelligence services, blamed a cyberattack for the damage.

Insurance Loans Mortgage Attorney Credit Lawyer

The Iranian

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Sydney could see more coronavirus infections after potential case in Manly
NEXT Convoy of carnage: MAX HASTINGS writes about one of the most dramatic forgotten ...