Coronavirus UK: South Asian communities in England were more at risk from death ...

South Asian communities in England were more at risk during the second wave of coronavirus than other ethnic groups, a study has found.

Researchers said disparities for hospital admissions and death from Covid-19 improved for most minority ethnic groups between the first and second wave of the pandemic.

But this gap widened for those from South Asian backgrounds between the February to September wave and then September to December last year. 

The findings, published in the journal Lancet, are based on 17 million adults in England and thought to be the largest study to date.

Dr Rohini Mathur, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said: 'Despite the improvements seen in most minority ethnic groups in the second wave compared to the first, it's concerning to see that the disparity widened among South Asian groups.

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Researchers said disparities for hospital admissions and death from Covid-19 improved for most minority ethnic groups between the first and second wave of the pandemic (file image)

Researchers said disparities for hospital admissions and death from Covid-19 improved for most minority ethnic groups between the first and second wave of the pandemic (file image)

'This highlights an urgent need to find effective prevention measures that fit with the needs of the UK's ethnically diverse population.'

The scientists said health factors - such as body weight, blood pressure and underlying health conditions - as well as household size could be some of the key factors for disparity in Covid-19 mortality for South Asian groups.

Dr Rohini Mathur, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Dr Rohini Mathur, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Possible solutions could include reducing structural disadvantage and inequality as well as improving access to healthcare across all minority ethnic groups, the researchers said. 

Dr Mathur said: 'While multigenerational living may increase risk of exposure and transmission (from children or working age adults to older or vulnerable family members), such households and extended communities also offer valuable informal

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