Young boy diagnosed with moyamoya after saying his hand felt weird

'My hand feels funny': How an eight-year-old boy's seemingly innocent comment to his mother during a family lunch led to a devastating diagnosis that turned their world upside down Ollie Hawes was playing when his mum Helen noticed something was wrong Ms Hawes said Ollie's face 'drooped' and he commented that his hand felt 'funny' An MRI later diagnosed him with a progressive condition called moyamoya 

By Alana Mazzoni For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 09:07 BST, 1 May 2021 | Updated: 09:07 BST, 1 May 2021

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An eight-year-old boy complained to his paints that his hands were feeling 'funny' during a family lunch - it was the moment his life was turned upside down.

Ollie Hawes, from the NSW Mid North Coast, was playing with his cousins on a family holiday in April when his mother Helen noticed something seemed amiss.

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Ms Hawes said she looked away for a moment, but as she turned back to Ollie his face had 'drooped'.

Ollie Hawes, 8, was diagnosed with with a progressive condition called moyamoya, a rare blood vessel disorder in which the carotid artery in the skull becomes blocked or narrowed, reducing blood flow to your brain

Ollie Hawes, 8, was diagnosed with with a progressive condition called moyamoya, a rare blood vessel disorder in which the carotid artery in the skull becomes blocked or narrowed, reducing blood flow to your brain

'It wasn't clear but he managed to say to me, 'my hand feels funny'. He was still stood up but it was just his right side was a bit odd,' she told 7News.

Ms Hawes, a registered nurse, rushed her son to a local hospital before he was transferred to Sydney's Children's Hospital at Westmead.

A CT scan and MRI later diagnosed him with a progressive condition called moyamoya, a rare blood vessel disorder in which the carotid artery in the skull becomes blocked or

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