Melissa DeRosa 'screamed' at and 'bullied' Rep. Stefanik over Cuomo plan to ...

Andrew Cuomo's top aide Melissa DeRosa 'screamed' at and 'bullied' Rep. Elise Stefanik over her opposition to the governor's plan to shift ventilators from less hard-hit areas of the state to New York City last year, according to a report.

A source told the New York Post DeRosa, 38, called the Republican congresswoman, 36, on her personal cellphone 'furious' to get her to walk back her comments about Cuomo's executive order. 

Stefanik reportedly refused and the two women haven't spoken since.

The incident marked the final nail in the coffin to the two women's 20-year friendship that began when they both attended elite prep school Albany Academy for Girls in upstate New York and had - up until then - survived their opposing political paths.  

De Rosa, who works as secretary to the governor and is a member of his COVID-19 taskforce, has found herself increasingly drawn into the scandal surrounding Cuomo in recent months. 

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DeRosa was said to have been among the small inner circle of aides in the governor's office responsible for attempts to smear an ex-staffer who has accused the governor of sexual harassment.  

And, back in February, it was DeRosa who made the bombshell confession that the state had withheld the damning data on the number of COVID-19 deaths in New York nursing homes from the administration.  

Andrew Cuomo's top aide Melissa DeRosa

Rep. Elise Stefanik

Andrew Cuomo's top aide Melissa DeRosa (left) 'screamed' at and 'bullied' Rep. Elise Stefanik (right) over her opposition to the governor's plan to shift ventilators from less hard-hit areas of the state to New York City last year, according to a report

Stefanik and DeRosa in happier times in 2015. The two women have been friends for 20 years before things soured last year

Stefanik and DeRosa in happier times in 2015. The two women have been friends for 20 years before things soured last year

Last April, New York City became the virus epicenter of the world, hospitals were on the brink of collapse and bodies were piling up in refrigerated trucks in the streets of the city. 

Cuomo announced an executive order that he could seize life-saving medical equipment - predominantly ventilators that were in short supply - from areas less hard- hit and send them to hospitals most in need.

'I'm going to sign an executive order that says the state can take ventilators and personal protective equipment from institutions that don't need them now and redeploy them,' Cuomo said at the time.

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The announcement sparked an instant backlash from some state and federal New York lawmakers, with Stefanik leading the revolt.

She publicly hit out at the plan calling it a 'grave concern to the hospitals in my district' saying it could leave the most vulnerable areas without when cases rises in those areas.  

Stefanik, a Republican, represents New York's 21st congressional district in Glen Falls, which is home to the state's highest percentage of seniors of any congressional district. 

Despite DeRosa's phone call, Stefanik refused to walk back her comments.  

Cuomo later abandoned his plan for ventilators but the damage was already done to the two women's longtime friendship.   

Since then, the feud has escalated and they have exchanged barbs with each other in public ever since.   

Following the January 6 MAGA mob riot where Donald supporters stormed the Capitol in a violent insurrection that left five dead, calls mounted for Stefanik's resignation. 

Last April, Cuomo said he would seize life-saving medical equipment from areas less hard- hit and send them to hospitals most in need in NYC. This sparked a backlash from some lawmakers, with Stefanik leading the revolt

Last April, Cuomo said he would seize life-saving medical equipment from areas less hard- hit and send them to hospitals most in need in NYC. This sparked a backlash from some lawmakers, with Stefanik leading the revolt

Last April New York City was the virus epicenter of the world. A nurse treats a COVID-19 patient at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Manhattan last April

Last April New York City was the virus epicenter of the world. A nurse treats a COVID-19 patient at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Manhattan last April

Workers move bodies into refrigerated trucks in Brooklyn last April as funeral homes and hospitals struggled to cope with the death rates

Workers move bodies into refrigerated trucks in Brooklyn last April as funeral homes and hospitals struggled to cope with the death rates 

The lawmaker was among the Republicans who objected to the electoral college results being certified in favor of Joe Biden - despite multiple lawsuits, probes and a DOJ investigation finding no evidence of 's false claims that the election was 'stolen.' 

This led to a spat between the two women on Twitter with Stefanik making a thinly-veiled jibe at DeRosa and Cuomo's office while DeRosa accused her of being 'complicit' in the attempt to overthrow the government.

'The Worst Governor in America cowardly sends out his own NY Dem State Party Chair, top advisors, and spokespeople who publicly call for my resignation. And then they cowardly try to walk it back,' Stefanik wrote on January 8.

'Worst Governor in America. He and his team earn this title every single day.' 

DeRosa fired back heaping the blame for the five deaths onto her foe.  

'Let's all say it together now: @EliseStefanik was complicit in an attempt to overthrow the US government,' she wrote.  

'The effort resulted in 5 deaths, including a law enforcement officer. No amount of deflection changes these facts.' 

The next month, the tensions mounted further when DeRosa found herself at the center of the state's apparent cover-up of nursing home COVID-19 deaths.

Stefanik called DeRosa's damning phone call where she admitted the state withheld data on the true

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