Kingsway tram station in Holborn to open to public for first time in almost 70 ...

Kingsway tram station in Holborn to open to public for first time in almost 70 ...
Kingsway tram station in Holborn to open to public for first time in almost 70 ...

A 'hidden' tram station beneath the centre of London which was used in the 1998 film the Avengers is set to open to the public for the first time in almost 70 years.

The Kingsway station, in Holborn, has been sealed off to Londoners since it was closed in 1952, when the capital's once-extensive tram system fell out of favour with commuters who preferred the London Underground. 

The purpose of the ramp down into the gloom - in the middle of Southampton Row where it intersects with Theobolds Road - had long puzzled commuters. 

The spooky setting was used to depict a secret base in the spy action film The Avengers, an adaption of the popular 1970s TV series. 

It starred Uma Thurman, Ralph Fiennes and James Bond legend Sean Connery but was panned by critics. 

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The Kingsway subway took passengers from Holborn as far as Waterloo Bridge, linking the north and south tram networks together. 

From July 9, members of the public will be able to take a guided tour of the tunnel, at a cost of £45 per person.  

A 'hidden' tram station beneath the centre of London which was used in the 1998 film the Avengers is set to open to the public for the first time in almost 70 years. Above: The Kingsway Tunnel in 1929

A 'hidden' tram station beneath the centre of London which was used in the 1998 film the Avengers is set to open to the public for the first time in almost 70 years. Above: The Kingsway Tunnel in 1929

The Kingsway station, in Holborn, has been sealed off to Londoners since it was closed in 1952, when the capital's once-extensive tram system fell out of favour with commuters who preferred the London Underground

The Kingsway station, in Holborn, has been sealed off to Londoners since it was closed in 1952, when the capital's once-extensive tram system fell out of favour with commuters who preferred the London Underground

It was built by the now-defunct London County Council and was opened in 1906, after land became available following an operation to clear slums in Holborn. 

Speaking of how the subway looks today, Siddy Holloway, the engagement manager at the London Transport Museum, told The Guardian: 'There are glimpses of the old glamour that still shine through.'  

The expert said that, by the 1930s, the tram network had developed a reputation for being slow and uncomfortable when compared to the Tube. 

She said that whilst transport bosses tried to make it 'more glamorous', the perception remained that trams were 'not very good'.  

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The tunnel and station was built by the now-defunct London County Council and was opened in 1906, after land became available following an operation to clear slums in Holborn. Above: the subway in 1932

The tunnel and station was built by the now-defunct London County Council and was opened in 1906, after land became available following an operation to clear slums in Holborn. Above: the subway in 1932

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