Dolphin slaughter continues in the Faroe Islands as 53 more are butchered days ...

Dolphin slaughter continues in the Faroe Islands as 53 more are butchered days ...
Dolphin slaughter continues in the Faroe Islands as 53 more are butchered days ...

The slaughter of dolphins in the Faroe Islands has continued after 53 more were butchered, just days after more than 1,400 were killed in a beach bloodbath that sparked global outrage.

Haunting photographs show slain pilot whales, among the largest of the oceanic dolphins, laying with their guts sprawled across the bloodied ground of Kollafjørður port on the south of the island. 

Among the dead dolphins, which were lined up at the port to be distributed around the area, appear to be calves due to their smaller sizes. 

The killings come just days after horrifying video emerged showing the sea turning red with blood as Faroe Islanders slaughtered 1,428 dolphins during a 'rogue hunt'. 

Haunting photographs have shown slain pilot whales, among the largest of the oceanic dolphins, laying with their guts sprawled across the bloodied ground of Kollafjørður port in the south of the island

Haunting photographs have shown slain pilot whales, among the largest of the oceanic dolphins, laying with their guts sprawled across the bloodied ground of Kollafjørður port in the south of the island

The slain dolphins seen with huge cuts on the heads as they are laid out in rows amongst shipping containers at a port in Kollafjørður in the Faroe Islands

The slain dolphins seen with huge cuts on the heads as they are laid out in rows amongst shipping containers at a port in Kollafjørður in the Faroe Islands

The latest hunt saw 53 dolphins killed in the village of Kollafjørður, just 10km away from where the 1,428 were slaughtered

The latest hunt saw 53 dolphins killed in the village of Kollafjørður, just 10km away from where the 1,428 were slaughtered

Among the dead dolphins, which were lined up at the port to be distributed around the area, appear to be calves (left of picture) due to their smaller sizes

Among the dead dolphins, which were lined up at the port to be distributed around the area, appear to be calves (left of picture) due to their smaller sizes

The killings come just days after horrifying video emerged showing the sea turning red with blood as Faroe Islanders slaughtered 1,428 dolphins during a 'rogue hunt'

The killings come just days after horrifying video emerged showing the sea turning red with blood as Faroe Islanders slaughtered 1,428 dolphins during a 'rogue hunt' 

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Footage showed men appearing to butcher the animals with some of the dolphins seen writhing around on the shoreline.   

It was one of the largest massacres ever recorded during the traditional centuries-old annual hunt known as the Grindadrap, or Grind, in Faroese. During the hunt, the whales are herded into a bay by local boats before having their spinal chords severed.  

But the scale of the slaughter has turned even some of the most traditional islanders against the annual hunt with some calling it 'cruel and unnecessary'.  

The latest hunt saw 53 dolphins killed in the village of Kollafjørður, just 10km away from where the 1,428 were slaughtered. 

Their slain bodies were seen lined up in rows at a shipping port as their blood pooled on the wet ground.  

Islanders usually kill up to 1,000 sea mammals a year, with pilot whales being the main target according to data kept by the Faroe Islands, but now the figure has reached 1,461. 

But this year's eye-watering death toll of white sided dolphins has angered many islanders, who despite the traditions have condemned the mass-slaughter. 

'I get nauseous seeing this kind of thing,' said one islander on local broadcaster Kringvarp Foroya's Facebook page, while another exclaimed, 'I'm embarrassed to be Faroese.'      

Their slain bodies were seen lined up in rows at a shipping port as their blood pooled on the wet ground

Their slain bodies were seen lined up in rows at a shipping port as their blood pooled on the wet ground

Horrific images show the bloody scene at the port where the slain dolphins had their stomachs cut to reveal their guts

Horrific images show the bloody scene at the port where the slain dolphins had their stomachs cut to reveal their guts

Marine conservation charity Sea Shepherd UK has been campaigning against the routine massacres for many years, headed up by Chief Operating Officer Rob Read, 47.

Mr Read said: 'Many people aren't even aware of this practice - it is such a cruel thing to do.

'In these killings, no animal is spared - adults, calves, and even pregnant mothers.' 

In the hunt, pods of dolphins and whales are forced up onto a beach before being killed - and the activity can see an entire genetic group wiped out. 

Mr Read added: 'There is no need for the meat in Faroe Islands nowadays and it shouldn't be happening.'

'Now, it is little more than sport, using tradition as justification, and that's why we campaign against it.

'This is why we will never give up opposing it and we're determined to raise awareness to make change.' 

Speaking about the slaughter of the 1,428 dolphins two weeks ago, Olavur Sjurdarberg, chairman of the Faroese Pilot Whale Hunt Association, admitted his hunters had made mistakes when carrying out the killings. 

But he went onto suggest that the use of smartphones and social media is putting a negative spin on an important island tradition.

'It was a big mistake, somebody should have known better,' said Mr Sjurdarberg.

'When the pod was found, they estimated it to be only 200 dolphins. Most people are in shock about what happened.' 

He added: 'The world has become much smaller today, with everyone walking around with a camera in their pocket.

'This is a fabulous treat for those who want us badly when it comes to the Grind.'

Horrifying new video has emerged showing the sea turning red with blood as Faroe Islanders slaughtered 1,438 dolphins during a 'rogue' hunt

Horrifying new video has emerged showing the sea turning red with blood as Faroe Islanders slaughtered 1,438 dolphins during a 'rogue' hunt

Footage shows men appearing to butcher the animals with some of the dolphins seen writhing around on the shoreline

Footage shows men appearing to butcher the animals with some of the dolphins seen writhing around on the shoreline

The footage showed hundreds of slaughtered dolphins lined up on the shore after they were butchered by islanders

The footage showed hundreds of slaughtered dolphins lined up on the shore after they were butchered by islanders

Boats drove the animals towards the shore of Skálafjørður where men waited in the shallows with hooks, knives and spears as part of the local tradition

Boats drove the animals towards the shore of Skálafjørður where men waited in the shallows with hooks, knives and spears as part of the local tradition

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Faroese are divided on the Grind but many urge foreign media and NGOs to respect their traditional island culture where fishing retains a central place and the meat is kept for food

Faroese are divided on the Grind but many urge foreign media and NGOs to respect their traditional island culture where fishing retains a central place and the meat is kept for food

Heri Petersen, the foreman of one of the local Grind associations responsible for the hunt, said he was not informed of the drive and 'strongly dissociated' himself what appeared to be a poorly organised and unusual hunt.

'I'm appalled at what happened,' he told local web-based In.fo news site. 'The dolphins lay on the beach writhing for far too long before they were killed.'  

However, much the anger expressed by locals appears to be directed towards the killing of dolphins specifically rather than the tradition of the Grind itself, which provides meat for families on the islands year-round.

Trondur Olsen, a journalist for Kringvarp Foroya said: 'We did a quick poll yesterday asking whether we should continue to kill these dolphins. Just over 50% said no, and just over 30% said yes.' 

He added that in contrast, a separate poll suggested that 80% said they wanted to continue with the killing of pilot whales. 

Heri Petersen, the foreman of one of the local Grind associations responsible for the hunt, said he was not informed of the drive and 'strongly dissociated' himself what appeared to be a poorly organised and unusual hunt

Heri Petersen, the foreman of one of the local Grind associations responsible for the hunt, said he was not informed of the drive and 'strongly dissociated' himself what appeared to be a poorly organised and unusual hunt

But the scale of the slaughter has turned even some of the most traditional islanders against the annual hunt with some calling it 'cruel and unnecessary'

But the scale of the slaughter has turned even some of the most traditional islanders against the annual hunt with some calling it 'cruel and unnecessary' 

Springwatch star Chris Packham joined criticism of the horrifying scenes, saying he was 'struggling to process' the massacre

Springwatch star Chris Packham joined criticism of the horrifying scenes, saying he was 'struggling to process' the massacre

Other islanders took to social media to respond to the outcry and clarify their sentiments to outlets reporting on the massacre.

'The reason some Faroe Islanders are criticising is because that one hunt had several errors,' said one user in response to Euro News.

'Firstly, it was white-sided dolphins and not pilot whales, the former of which we're not used to. Secondly, our equipment isn't designed for them. It's not about the grind as a whole.

'I expect either a moratorium on the hunt of these dolphins, or the creation

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