Western Sydney lawyer, 36, who was 'waiting for Pfizer' dies at home of Covid ...

Western Sydney lawyer, 36, who was 'waiting for Pfizer' dies at home of Covid ...
Western Sydney lawyer, 36, who was 'waiting for Pfizer' dies at home of Covid ...

The death of a newly-qualified lawyer and father-of-four from Covid-19 at his home has highlighted a problem among ethnic communities of people resisting treatment for the potentially deadly illness.

William Orule, 36, died alone in his western Sydney home on August 20 after being ill with the virus for nine days, soon after telling his cousin he was feeling 'better than previous days'.

The father-of-four is one of 40 people who have died of the virus at home during the current outbreak of the Delta variant, with over half of them having not being tested for the virus.

His family said that Mr Orule, who emigrated from South Sudan, was only weeks away from receiving his first dose of the Pfizer vaccine, with an appointment booked for October. 

William Orule (pictured left), a lawyer and South Sudanese community leader died inside his western Sydney home from Covid-19

William Orule (pictured left), a lawyer and South Sudanese community leader died inside his western Sydney home from Covid-19

Speaking to ABC's 7.30, Mr Orule's cousin Edward Massimino explained that he and his family would check up on him, but his condition deteriorated suddenly. 

'Every day, twice a day, we checked on him in the morning and then in the evening,' Mr Massimino said.

'And he also told us the Department of Health staff were checking on him. The last thing we always said was, 'Do you need to go to the hospital? We are ready to call for an ambulance.' And he said, 'No, I'm OK'.'

Mr Massimino was unsure why his cousin did not call for an ambulance, and the family is blaming themselves for not doing more to help. 

Mr Olise was found dead by police who attended his home to conduct routine welfare checks on Covid positive patients.

Mr Orule (pictured left) told his cousin that he was feeling 'better than previous day' before police found him dead on August 20

Mr Orule (pictured left) told his cousin that he was feeling 'better than previous day' before police found him dead on August 20

Just over half of those who have died from Covid-19 whilst at home were not known to health authorities and hadn't yet been diagnosed with the virus.

29 people have died while at home in NSW, most being residents of western Sydney.

13 of those were known to NSW Health and the remaining 16 were diagnosed with Covid-19 after their death.

William Orule emigrated from South Sudan in 2003 with his cousin Edward Massimino through Australia's refugee program.

Mr Orule taught himself english and worked a number of jobs while pursuing an education at TAFE and university.

The father-of-four is being remembered as a brilliant man who helped his community and all those around him (pictured, William Orule in front of the Sydney Opera House)

The father-of-four is

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