Campaigners celebrate as developers drop bid to build 5,000 homes on ...

Campaigners celebrate as developers drop bid to build 5,000 homes on ...
Campaigners celebrate as developers drop bid to build 5,000 homes on ...

Plans to build 5,000 homes on a historic landscape which was immortalised by artist John Constable have been axed, it has emerged.

The celebrated land on the edge of the South Downs in Hampshire was recreated in watercolours by the 19th century artist as he considered the setting so inspirational.

The picturesque landscape that he captured in his 'A View at Hursley' came under threat due to controversial plans to construct an entire town on it.

Developers put forward proposals to build 5,000 homes, two primary schools, a secondary school, a park and ride and a health centre - all powered by three solar farms.

However, the plans have now been dropped following huge backlash.

Old master John Constable's 'A View at Hursley' was inspired by the rolling greenery in the picturesque Hampshire village

Old master John Constable's 'A View at Hursley' was inspired by the rolling greenery in the picturesque Hampshire village 

An aerial view of Hursley with the site marked in red showing the proposed 5,000 new homes would have been built

An aerial view of Hursley with the site marked in red showing the proposed 5,000 new homes would have been built

Hursley Parish Council chair David Killeen, Hampshire County Councillor Jan Warwick and historian David Key at the site

Hursley Parish Council chair David Killeen, Hampshire County Councillor Jan Warwick and historian David Key at the site

An aerial view of Hursley House with the villlage of Hursley against the land in which the proposed development site would have been

An aerial view of Hursley House with the villlage of Hursley against the land in which the proposed development site would have been

The 'pristine' area where developers wanted to create 'Royaldown' sits on downland between the ancient village of Hursley - which is considered to be one of the most historic in the country - and the cathedral city of Winchester.

The area has a 'unique history' not only because of Constable's paintings, but its history can also be traced back to King Alfred fighting the Danes, and then to Word War Two and the development of the Spitfire.

Councillor Brian Laming, who represents the area for Winchester City Council, rejoiced at news of the dropped plans.

Hampshire County Councillor and Hursley resident Jan Warwick observes a possible location where John Constable based his art

Hampshire County Councillor and Hursley resident Jan Warwick observes a possible location where John Constable based his art

Keep Architecture's aerial plan of where the new Royaldown development could have been situated, with Hursley shown to the left

Keep Architecture's aerial plan of where the new Royaldown development could have been situated, with Hursley shown to the left

The 72-year-old Liberal Democrat said: 'It's a huge victory for us, so many people have put the work in to try to stop this.

'For four or five years the plans have been around, so to overturn it after that amount of time is quite extraordinary - it's been a long battle.

'It's got a unique history and landscape. This area needs to be preserved, not just because of its history but for the environment.

'It was a major concern for us, it was a substantial build, it would have dwarfed Hursley and [neighbouring parish] Oliver's Battery.'

Perched on the edge of the South Downs, the countryside was immortalised by 19th century artist John Constable in water colours

Perched on the edge of the South Downs, the countryside was immortalised by 19th century artist John Constable in water colours

Chairman of Hursley Parish Council David Killeen inside the Community Shop & Post Office where he works in the village. He said the 5,000 homes would have turned 'a rural area into an urban area'

Chairman of Hursley Parish Council David Killeen inside the Community Shop & Post Office where he works in the village. He said the 5,000 homes would have turned 'a rural area into an urban area'

Local historian Dave Key said Hursley was a popular destination for a number of England's most prominent artists in the 18th and early 19th century and it was not surprising that

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