UK's 'outdated' cyberlaws must be reformed, campaigners say

UK's 'outdated' cyberlaws must be reformed, campaigners say
UK's 'outdated' cyberlaws must be reformed, campaigners say

The UK's cybersecurity laws must be urgently updated to protect the public from hackers, a poll has found.

Two thirds of Britons back calls to redraft the 30-year-old Computer Misuse Act as it leaves people highly vulnerable to attack.

The survey was carried out by the CyberUp campaign, which argues that 'outdated' legislation has failed to keep up with technology.

The UK's cybersecurity laws must be urgently updated to protect the public from hackers, a poll has found. Two thirds of Britons back calls to redraft the 30-year-old Computer Misuse Act as it leaves people highly vulnerable to attack. The survey was carried out by the CyberUp campaign, which argues that ‘outdated’ legislation has failed to keep up with technology

The UK's cybersecurity laws must be urgently updated to protect the public from hackers, a poll has found. Two thirds of Britons back calls to redraft the 30-year-old Computer Misuse Act as it leaves people highly vulnerable to attack. The survey was carried out by the CyberUp campaign, which argues that 'outdated' legislation has failed to keep up with technology

Currently, security experts must ask the permission of hacking and scamming gangs to interrogate their computers - or else face prosecution.

They are calling on the government to allow them to do so without first having to ask, as long as it is in the public interest.

It is supported by leaders of the UK's multibillion-pound tech industry, several politicians, and the Confederation of British Industry (CBI).

Currently, security experts must ask the permission of hacking and scamming gangs to interrogate their computers - or else face prosecution. They are calling on the government to allow them to do so without first having to ask, as long as it is in the public interest. It is supported by leaders of the UK's multibillion-pound tech industry, several politicians, and the Confederation of British Industry (CBI)

Currently, security experts must ask the permission of hacking and scamming gangs to interrogate their computers - or else face prosecution. They are calling on the government to allow them to do so without first having to ask, as long as it is in the public interest. It is supported by leaders of the UK's multibillion-pound tech industry, several politicians, and the Confederation of British Industry (CBI)

Kat Sommer, head of public affairs at NCC Group, a cyber security company supporting the CyberUp Campaign, said: 'The Act– written in 1990 – didn't foresee the birth of the cyber security profession, and therefore leaves ethical cyber security researchers in the lurch as to whether or not they will be prosecuted simply for doing their jobs. 

'The result is a chilling effect on the cyber security industry, leaving the UK less safe from cyber criminals. It's good to see that the public's instincts confirm what we believe to be indisputable: the time has come for an update to our cyber laws.'

Investigators say the current law makes it illegal for them to infiltrate cybercriminals' networks and then relay information back to the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) to take action.

Investigators say the current law makes it illegal for them to infiltrate cybercriminals' networks and then relay information back to the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) to take action

Investigators say the current law makes it illegal for them to infiltrate cybercriminals' networks and then relay information back to the National Cyber Security

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