Rishi Sunak says he is 'confident' there will be gifts under the tree this ...

Rishi Sunak says he is 'confident' there will be gifts under the tree this ...
Rishi Sunak says he is 'confident' there will be gifts under the tree this ...

Rishi Sunak has said he is 'confident' Christmas presents will still be in stores despite the escalating supply chain crisis.

The Chancellor blamed global factors for the chaos and admitted the government 'can't fix every single problem'.

But he said ministers are doing 'absolutely everything we can' to solve issues at British ports and in shops ahead of the festive period.

It comes as supermarkets and retailers are believed to be planning to bring forward Christmas sales by up to a month to prevent empty shelves in December.

Industry bosses said promotions will be triggered early to avoid a late rush after holding talks with the government.

Meanwhile families were warned to start shopping now amid fears supplies of toys, electrical goods and other products will be disrupted by logjams at UK ports.

Retail leaders said the shortage of HGV drivers to carry loads from docks around the coast is threatening festivities and the wider economy.

But in a boost for shoppers, one of the biggest suppliers of turkeys in the country assured customers Christmas dinner was not off the table just yet.

Ronald Kers, Group CEO of 2 Sisters Food Group, which is associated with Bernard Matthews, said it was bringing in 700 more workers for the festive period.

The Chancellor blamed global factors for the chaos and admitted the government 'can't fix every single problem'

The Chancellor blamed global factors for the chaos and admitted the government 'can't fix every single problem'

But he said ministers are doing 'absolutely everything we can' to solve issues at British ports (pictured, Felixstowe this week) and in shops ahead of the festive period

But he said ministers are doing 'absolutely everything we can' to solve issues at British ports (pictured, Felixstowe this week) and in shops ahead of the festive period

It comes as supermarkets and retailers are believed to be planning to bring forward Christmas sales by up to a month to prevent empty shelves in December (file photo)

It comes as supermarkets and retailers are believed to be planning to bring forward Christmas sales by up to a month to prevent empty shelves in December (file photo)

PS5 advert from EE

PS5 advert from Game

Adverts posted by EE and Game over the past few days show how much anticipation there is whenever a PS5 comes in stock

Mr Sunak set out to reassure the country Christmas will not be cancelled this year amid the ongoing crisis.

He told the BBC: 'I tell people they should be reassured we are doing absolutely everything we can to mitigate these challenges.

'They are global in nature, so we can't fix every single problem. But I feel confident there will be good provision of goods for everybody.

'And we are working our way to remove blockages where we can as with HGV drivers for example where we've provided short term visas.'

Supermarkets are set to move early to prevent a sudden rush in December by bringing forward sales by up to a month.

Retail bosses said it was 'prudent' to extend discounts for shoppers to mitigate the HGV driver shortage and port chaos.

Newly-appointed supply chain Sir Dave Lewis held a conference call with retails chiefs yesterday, the Telegraph reports.

One is believed to have claimed the officials asked companies to start festive deals early - but this was shot down by government insiders.

The source said: 'We do understand that most of the retailers are doing that anyway. That's a business decision they have taken.'

Chief Executive of Iceland Richard Walker said it was one of those starting sales early, adding: 'It's prudent to get ahead of the game.'

Morrisons launched a 'mega sale' yesterday as it slashed prices on brands including Disney Princess by up to 50 per cent.

iPhone stock levels

Cocomelon doll stock levels

The London-based website Stock Informer, which tracks which retailers have popular products available, states that there is no stock for any of these four products anywhere other than eBay or online marketplace StockX

It is reported that shoppers in Britain are already struggling to get their hands on presents

It is reported that shoppers in Britain are already struggling to get their hands on presents

PlayStation 5's that were on display but out of stock in Kingston, West London, on Wednesday

PlayStation 5's that were on display but out of stock in Kingston, West London, on Wednesday

Elf on the Shelf supplies may also be affected, with one million of the toys being held in China ahead of shipping (file photo)

Elf on the Shelf supplies may also be affected, with one million of the toys being held in China ahead of shipping (file photo)

People shop for Toys in Kingston, London. Gary Grant, of the toy giant The Entertainer, said Barbie dolls and Paw Patrol toys are ‘prime candidates for being short in the Christmas season’

People shop for Toys in Kingston, London. Gary Grant, of the toy giant The Entertainer, said Barbie dolls and Paw Patrol toys are 'prime candidates for being short in the Christmas season'

Families were warned last night to start shopping for Christmas now amid fears toys, electrical goods and other products will be disrupted by logjams at UK ports.

Retail leaders said the shortage of HGV drivers to carry loads from docks around the coast is threatening festivities and the wider economy.

Shipping giant Maersk diverted some supersize vessels away from Felixstowe – the UK's largest container port – to alternatives on the Continent such as Rotterdam.

It is hoped containers will then be transferred to smaller ships that should find it easier to get a berth at smaller UK docks.

Meanwhile, supermarkets have been trying to fill up empty shelves with products they do have in stock, with a Tesco Extra in Cardiff placing dozens of sunflower oil bottles near a frozen food section.

David Jinks, of the parcel delivery firm ParcelHero, said: 'Britain's Christmas is relying on a Dunkirk-style removal of goods from Europe on to smaller ships bound for ports across the UK. That looks to be the only way to bring many Christmas gifts home.'

Some businesses are wary of leaving shelves stripped bare, filling fruit and vegetable aisles with festive items such as Quality Street and Celebrations.

Thousands of shipping containers at Felixstowe in Suffolk, as shipping giant Maersk is diverting vessels away to unload elsewhere in Europe

Thousands of shipping containers at Felixstowe in Suffolk, as shipping giant Maersk is diverting vessels away to unload elsewhere in Europe

Desperate steel, chemicals and glass factories plead for tax breaks on soaring energy bills as Boris prepares to sign off hundreds of millions of pounds in LOANS 

Desperate steel, chemicals and glass factories today pleaded for tax breaks to help them cope with soaring energy bills - as Boris Johnson prepares to sign off hundreds of millions of pounds in loans to keep them afloat. 

Energy-intensive businesses insisted cutting taxes and levies was more important than a bailout, after an extraordinary bout of wrangling in Whitehall.

Mr Johnson appears to have sided with Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng following his spat with Chancellor Rishi Sunak over the need for government support. 

A package is now due within days, but rather than handouts or a price cap on industrial energy costs, it is expected to come in the form of loans.

It is understood the support will also come with 'strings attached', ensuring companies cannot pay out big bonuses while they are benefiting. 

The move could raise concerns that the government is merely kicking the can down the road, as firms will have to repay the costs later when energy prices have settled down. 

The Treasury is said to have been alarmed at the prospect of doling out more cash, warning that 'demands simply increase' when sectors know the Chancellor is involved in the process.

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