Netflix CEO tells staff 'we are on the right side of history' defending Dave ...

Netflix CEO tells staff 'we are on the right side of history' defending Dave ...
Netflix CEO tells staff 'we are on the right side of history' defending Dave ...

Netflix's CEO told staff the firm was 'on the right side of history' for continuing to stream and promote Dave Chappelle's controversial comedy special The Closer.

A leaked transcript from an internal Netflix message board between company employees recorded disagreements about Chappelle's controversial comedy special. 

Netflix's co-chief executive Reed Hastings told employees that Chappelle is 'a unique voice' as he defended the comedian who has come under fire for his defense of author J.K. Rowling and jokes a vocal few are calling transphobic.    

Transgender employees are so upset by The Closer and Netflix's stance that they are planning a walkout on October 20.

Dave Chappelle continues to face backlash over the controversial contents of his latest Netflix special, The Closer, which critics say were transphobic

Dave Chappelle continues to face backlash over the controversial contents of his latest Netflix special, The Closer, which critics say were transphobic

Activists have been clamoring for the title's removal from Netflix, with a number of the company's employees scheduled to stage a walkout in protest

Activists have been clamoring for the title's removal from Netflix, with a number of the company's employees scheduled to stage a walkout in protest

When one employee asked if the company was 'making the wrong historical choice around hate speech' on the internal message board, Hastings replied 'To your macro question on being on the right side of history, we will always continue to reflect on the tensions between freedom and safety. 

'I do believe that our commitment to artistic expression and pleasing our members is the right long term choice for Netflix, and that we are on the right side, but only time will tell,' according to The New York Times

He also noted that Chappelle is popular with viewers, citing the 'stickiness' of his most recent special. 

The Closer has scored 96 per cent positive reviews from regular viewers on Rotten Tomatoes - but just 43 per cent from woke critics. 

Hastings wrote: 'The core strategy is to please our members.' 

Discussing whether Chapelle's commentary was harmful Hastings said 'In stand-up comedy, comedians say lots of outrageous things for effect. Some people like the art form, or at least particular comedians, and others do not.' 

Another employee claimed that the famous comedian had a history of homophobia and bigotry to which Hastings said on behalf of the company, 'We disagree with your characterization and we'll continue to work with Dave Chappelle in the future.'

'We see him as a unique voice, but can understand if you or others never want to watch his show.'

He continued, 'We do not see Dave Chappelle as harmful, or in need of any offset, which we obviously and respectfully disagree on.' 

This comes after Netflix's other co-chief executive, Ted Sarandos, defended Chappelle and his comedy special in an email to staff. 

Netflix boss Ted Sarandos has defended Dave Chappelle's The Closer special to his staff, telling them in an email 'content on screen doesn't translate to real-world harm'

Netflix boss Ted Sarandos has defended Dave Chappelle's The Closer special to his staff, telling them in an email 'content on screen doesn't translate to real-world harm'

Lesbian comedian Hannah Gadsby dragged Sarando on Instagram for using her name to defend Chappelle and Netflix's 'amoral algorithm cult'

Lesbian comedian Hannah Gadsby dragged Sarando on Instagram for using her name to defend Chappelle and Netflix's 'amoral algorithm cult'

'We know that a number of you have been left angry, disappointed and hurt by our decision to put Dave Chappelle's latest special on Netflix,' Sarandos wrote in the email, obtained by Variety.

'With 'The Closer,' we understand that the concern is not about offensive-to-some content but titles which could increase real world harm (such as further marginalizing already marginalized groups, hate, violence etc.)

'Last year, we heard similar concerns about 365 Days and violence against women. While some employees disagree, we have a strong belief that content on screen doesn't directly translate to real-world harm,' he continued.

Movie 365 Days, referenced by Sarandos, is about an Italian mafia boss who kidnaps a woman he's infatuated with and demands she spend the next year in his villa.

The movie was slammed by survivors of sexual assault, with singer Duffy writing in an open letter to CEO and co-founder Reed Hastings that it 'glamorizes the brutal reality of sex trafficking, kidnapping and rape.'

Sarandos' memo continued, 'The strongest evidence to support this is that violence on screens has grown hugely over the last thirty years, especially with first party shooter games, and yet violent

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