Watchdog demands that police face random trawls of phones to stamp out ...

Watchdog demands that police face random trawls of phones to stamp out ...
Watchdog demands that police face random trawls of phones to stamp out ...

Police officers should face random spot checks on their phones to help tackle the 'revolting' online misconduct as shown by Met officer who shared photos of two murdered sisters, the chief inspector of constabulary has said.

Sir Tom Windsor has said that trawls of private and work mobile phones would help deter officers using WhatsApp and other social media channels to share photographs of crime scenes and inappropriate jokes.

He said online misconduct like this also includes misogyny and sexual harassment, racist, sexist and homophobic slurs. 

Sir Tom Windsor has said that trawls of private and work mobile phones would help deter officers using WhatsApp and other social media channels to share photographs of crime scenes and inappropriate jokes

Sir Tom Windsor has said that trawls of private and work mobile phones would help deter officers using WhatsApp and other social media channels to share photographs of crime scenes and inappropriate jokes

He told The Times he supported the idea that staff and police officers are to be checked in the same way they are required to undertake random drug tests.

Home Secretary Priti Patel asked Windsor to examine how police forces were dealing with predators and mysogynistic behaviour.

This comes after PC Wayne Couzens murdered Sarah Everard, exposing errors in vetting practices.

This also raised national concerns surrounding policing culture in the UK.

Windsor's comments follow closely behind this week's admission by Metropolitan Police constables Deniz Jaffer, 48, and Jamie Lewis, 33, after they photo graphed the bodies of two murdered sisters in Wembley, north London.

The pair then shared the picture with colleagues on WhatsApp.

They were warned by the judge that they were 'extremely likely' to be jailed, as their 'repellent' actions towards sisters Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry had violated the public's trust.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) said that police officers were increasingly misusing social media and spreading racist, homophobic and misogynistic messages.

Another group of officers are now under investigation by the IOPC for doing exactly that on WhatsApp with Couzens, who was found guilty of the abduction, rape and murdered Everard in March.

There is also another Met probationary constable who sent a 'joke' to his

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