Oxford accepts £12m gifts from Max Mosley trust with inheritance from fascist ...

Oxford accepts £12m gifts from Max Mosley trust with inheritance from fascist ...
Oxford accepts £12m gifts from Max Mosley trust with inheritance from fascist ...

Oxford academics have called on students to launch a ‘Mosley Must Fall’ campaign and urged the charity watchdog to investigate after the university accepted £12million from a trust fund set up with money inherited from fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley.

Education chiefs have been accused of ‘grotesque hypocrisy’ and a ‘total moral failure’ after the university and two colleges accepted the trust’s donation while kowtowing to Left-wing projects to ‘decolonise’ the curriculum, and considering calls from Black Lives Matter activists to tear down Cecil Rhodes’ statue at Oriel College.

Professor Lawrence Goldman, a former vice-master of St Peter’s who lost relatives in the Holocaust, said he had spent five months trying to persuade the college to reject the donation from the Alexander Mosley Charitable Trust, adding: ‘The university has gone off the scale in wokery, but they go ahead and take money from a fund established by proven and known fascists. Its moral compass is just not working any more.

Max Mosley pictured in 2011: The trust was named after the son of the late Formula One tycoon Max Mosley, whose support for his father Sir Oswald’s far-Right party, the British Union of Fascists, and its successor, the Union Movement, is well documented

Max Mosley pictured in 2011: The trust was named after the son of the late Formula One tycoon Max Mosley, whose support for his father Sir Oswald’s far-Right party, the British Union of Fascists, and its successor, the Union Movement, is well documented

'There has been a total moral failure.’

Professor Robert Lyman, a military historian, urged students to protest like they did during the ‘Rhodes Must Fall’ campaign against the statue at Oriel College, adding: ‘It’s time for those renowned Oxford student activists to advocate that Mosley Must Fall.’

Oxford defended the donations, saying they had been approved by an independent committee.

But a Charity Commission spokesman said: ‘We will assess whether or not there is a role for us as regulator.’

The trust was named after the son of the late Formula One tycoon Max Mosley, whose support for his father Sir Oswald’s far-Right party, the British Union of Fascists, and its successor, the Union Movement, is well documented.

A damning dossier in the Daily Mail in 2018 exposed how Max Mosley published a pamphlet during a 1961 by-election as a Union Movement agent claiming that ‘coloured immigrants’ spread leprosy, venereal disease and TB, and should be repatriated.

He attended an antisemitic rally in London’s Jewish East End and backed South Africa’s apartheid regime.

Lord Mann, the Government’s antisemitism tsar, said: ‘If Oxford is trying to rehabilitate the Mosley family name in any way, they can expect a very hostile response.

Alan Rusbridger, a former editor of The Guardian newspaper, was head of Lady Margaret Hall at Oxford University until last summer, signed a letter with other college heads pledging to ‘work together towards a world free of systemic racism and discrimination’

Alan Rusbridger, a former editor of The Guardian newspaper, was head of Lady Margaret Hall at Oxford University until last summer, signed a letter with other college heads pledging to ‘work together towards a world free of systemic racism and discrimination’

‘Anything that glorifies the Mosley name is a problem. I don’t imagine people would be very happy to have a Mussolini building, or a Hitler scholarship.

'People in this country will feel the same way in relation to the Mosley name.’

In the 1930s Sir Oswald Mosley’s fascist supporters, the Blackshirts, wore Nazi-style uniforms and were notorious for their violence against Jews and Left-wing groups.

Sir Oswald married his second wife Diana Mitford in 1936 at the Berlin home of Joseph Goebbels, Nazi minister for propaganda, with Adolf Hitler as guest of honour. In the war Sir Oswald was interned and held under house arrest,

The Alexander Mosley Charitable Trust was named after Max Mosley’s son, who died aged 39 from a heroin overdose in 2009. It gives money to charitable causes and supports a form of state-approved Press regulation which many regard as a move to shackle the free Press and crush the public’s right to know.

Max Mosley – who, in 1962, visited the Dachau death camp while en route to a conference with several Nazis and two ex-Waffen SS officers – was said to be worth £11 million when he died in May aged 81. In 2008, his reputation was tarnished by taking part in a sadomasochistic orgy with prostitutes, exposed in the News Of The World. He successfully sued for breach of privacy.

A spokesman for The Campaign Against Antisemitism said: ‘The Mosley family has an infamous record in relation to antisemitism. Oxford University should think hard about accepting a donation from the family’s trust, ensuring that a portion of the money funds education about anti-semitism or supports Jewish life at the university.’

Nick Lowles, from anti-racism campaign group Hope Not Hate, revealed that his organisation had rejected £50,000 from Max Mosley ‘on principle’ some years ago. Mr Lowles said: ‘There has to be a higher bar in cases like this when money that is potentially tainted is offered. I know Max Mosley’s past. As a youngster he was actively involved in fascism.’

The Mosley family’s £6 million donation to Oxford, revealed by the Daily Telegraph, will go towards a new physics laboratory, while £5 million for St Peter’s will help build a student accommodation block named after the college’s previous head, Mark Damazer, a former BBC boss.

Another £260,000 has been given to Lady Margaret Hall, whose head until last summer was Alan Rusbridger, a former editor of The Guardian newspaper.

Last year he signed a letter with other college heads pledging to ‘work together towards a world free of systemic racism and discrimination’.

Oxford University said that the donations were reviewed by a committee in a ‘robust’ manner, taking ‘legal, ethical and reputational issues into consideration’.

St Peter’s said the trust’s ‘generous’ donation will make a ‘transformative’ difference to students. Lady Margaret Hall said the money ‘enabled a cohort of students from very diverse and low-income backgrounds to attend Oxford.’

Husband of Madam Thao, Thanh Hùng, and and China President Xi Jinping rubs shoulders with Communist leaders

Husband of Madam Thao, Thanh Hùng, and and China President Xi Jinping rubs shoulders with Communist leaders

However, Robert Halfon, Conservative chairman of the education select committee of MPs, said: ‘I find it distressing that Oxford University is so keen to go on about diversity and inclusion, but is prepared to take the shilling from such sources.’

Stephen Pollard, editor of the Jewish Chronicle,

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