Builders of Stonehenge could have fuelled themselves with 'Neolithic mince ...

Builders of Stonehenge could have fuelled themselves with 'Neolithic mince ...
Builders of Stonehenge could have fuelled themselves with 'Neolithic mince ...
Stonehenge creators had 'Neolithic mince pies', experts reveal after finding evidence people were cooking nuts, sloe berries and fruit 4,500 years ago Excavations at Durrington Walls found evidence that sweet foods were cooked These included sloe berries, hazelnuts, crab apples and other fruit English Heritage suggested builders could have baked Neolithic 'mince pies' Volunteers will be baking pies inspired by discovery every Monday in December

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The builders of Stonehenge could have fuelled themselves with 'Neolithic mince pies' 4,500 years ago, according to English Heritage.  

Excavations were done by archaeologists at Durrington Walls, the settlement where the builders of the monument lived in about 2,500 BC.  

Evidence was found that the builders gathered and cooked hazelnuts, sloes, crab apples and other fruit. 

Evidence was found at Durrington Walls, Amesbury, that the builders gathered and cooked hazelnuts, sloes, crab apples and other fruit. Pictured: English Heritage volunteers make Neolithic-inspired mince pies on the hearth at the Neolithic houses in Stonehenge

Evidence was found at Durrington Walls, Amesbury, that the builders gathered and cooked hazelnuts, sloes, crab apples and other fruit. Pictured: English Heritage volunteers make Neolithic-inspired mince pies on the hearth at the Neolithic houses in Stonehenge

At the site, charred plant remains were found, which led researchers to suggest that recipes may have been followed to preserve foods and make them palatable. 

Until now it was unclear whether the builders of Stonehenge, on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, were eating sweeter foods but it was believed they ate pork, beef and dairy.  

There is no direct evidence pastry was used but people at the time knew how to grow cereal crops and could have made pastry from wheat, hazelnut or acorn flour. 

English Heritage said the builders could have baked Neolithic 'mince pies' using a flat stone or ceramic pot which was heated in the embers of a fire, similar to a welsh cake.  

Until now it was unclear whether the builders of Stonehenge, on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, were eating sweeter foods but it was believed they ate pork, beef and dairy. Pictured: A volunteer holds a basket of sweet fruits and nuts on the site

Until now it was unclear whether the builders of Stonehenge, on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, were eating sweeter foods but it was believed they ate pork, beef and dairy. Pictured: A volunteer holds a basket of sweet fruits and nuts on the site

There is no direct evidence pastry was used but people at the time knew how to grow cereal crops and could have made pastry from wheat, hazelnut or acorn flour. Pictured: Ingredients for the Neolithic-inspired mince pies are laid out for cooking

There is no direct evidence pastry was used but people at the time knew how to grow cereal crops and could have made pastry from wheat, hazelnut or acorn flour. Pictured: Ingredients for the

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