WWI flying ace who was deadlier than the infamous Red Baron... now his medals ...

WWI flying ace who was deadlier than the infamous Red Baron... now his medals ...
WWI flying ace who was deadlier than the infamous Red Baron... now his medals ...

The medals of a First World War veteran who was deadlier than the legendary Red Baron have sold for over £7,000.

US-born Captain Frederick Gillet was 23 years old when he started operations with the Royal Flying Corps in August 1918 and he claimed 20 kills in just three months of flying.

His tally included three Fokker aircraft in the space of five minutes.

The pilot finished the war in November 1918 with 14 Fokkers, three kite balloons and three Albatross aircraft as his victims, earning a Distinguished Flying Cross with Bar for his 'great dash and skill'.

Pound for pound, Capt Gillet's success rate was greater than German ace Manfred von Richthofen - known as the Red Baron - who claimed 80 kills in 19 months before his death in March 1918. 

Capt Gillet was born in Baltimore, US, in 1895 but moved the Britain after being rejected by his home nation's air force. After the war, he returned to the US and became a businessman - dying in 1969 aged 74. 

Captain Frederick Gillet (1895-1969) started operations with the Royal Flying Corps in August 1918 and claimed 20 kills in just three months of flying

Captain Frederick Gillet (1895-1969) started operations with the Royal Flying Corps in August 1918 and claimed 20 kills in just three months of flying

The medals of a First World War flying ace Captain Gillet, who was deadlier than the legendary Red Baron, have sold for over £7,000.

The medals of a First World War flying ace Captain Gillet, who was deadlier than the legendary Red Baron, have sold for over £7,000.

His medals were sold by a private collector with London-based auctioneers Spink & Son, fetching a hammer price of £5,800. With extra fees, the final figure paid by the buyer was £7,200. 

His first victory was the destruction of a kite balloon north of Estaires in France on August 3, 1918.

Had Capt Gillet maintained his strike rate, he would have clocked up 126 kills in that period.

He was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) for shooting down a kite balloon east of Armentieres, which was being defended by an

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