Save the Children to stop using texts designed by paedophile artist Eric Gill

Save the Children to stop using texts designed by paedophile artist Eric Gill
Save the Children to stop using texts designed by paedophile artist Eric Gill
Save the Children will stop using font designed by disgraced paedophile artist Eric Gill in its branding Save the Children to drop use of Gill Sans typeface from its branding in 2022 The font was designed by disgraced artist and paedophile Eric Gill in 1928  BBC dropped use of Gill Sans last year following complaints from its audience  Gill hit headlines this week after protestor attacked one of his London sculptures

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Save the Children bosses have agreed to drop the font that was originally designed by disgraced artist and paedophile Eric Gill from its corporate branding.

The children's charity confirmed it would no longer use its logo featuring the Gill Sans typeface, that was designed by Gill himself and released for public use in the UK from 1928.  

Save the Children bosses have agreed to drop the font that was originally designed by disgraced artist and paedophile Eric Gill from its corporate branding

Save the Children bosses have agreed to drop the font that was originally designed by disgraced artist and paedophile Eric Gill from its corporate branding

Staff working with the organisation are said to have repeatedly warned managers of the dangers of linking the work of a known abuser with a children's charity before Gill's work was finally axed.

Save the Children reportedly agreed to drop Gill Sans from its branding last year after sources highlighted the potential hypocrisy of a children's organisation using artwork produced by a man who molested his two eldest daughters.

Gill made headlines again this week when a furious protestor, David Chick, was seen chipping away at one his 1933 statues that is on display outside BBC's Broadcast House in London.

Campaigners have long-called for the statue, named Prospero and Ariel, to be removed since it was revealed decades after his death in 1940 that its creator Eric Gill sexually abused his two eldest daughters. 

One source told managers that continuing to use Gill's artwork in the 21st century 'probably wasn't a good idea', reports The Times. 

On Save the Children's website, it declares its intention is to ensure 'children stay safe, healthy and keep learning.' 

But its most recently published guidelines from 2016 insist the use of Gill Sans Infant Standard is to be used across the organisation's vast array of published literature.

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