Head teacher scraps rules banning long or bleached hair, afros or man buns

Head teacher scraps rules banning long or bleached hair, afros or man buns
Head teacher scraps rules banning long or bleached hair, afros or man buns

A headteacher has scrapped rules banning long or bleached hair, afros or man buns and says pupils no longer have to wear a blazer and tie and urged other schools to rethink their uniform policies.  

Students at all-boys Verulam School in St Alban's still have to dress smartly but no longer are required to wear a blazer and tie.

In the past students could have been sent home from the school in Hertfordshire if their hair was 'extreme in style, colour or length.'

But Julie Richardson has relaxed hair and dress code policies at the school since she took over as its first female headteacher last September.  

She says the rules are outdated and do not fit with modern ideas on dress as well as unfairly targeting students of colour. 

Julie Richardson,  (pictured centre) headteacher at all-boy's Verulam School in St Alban's says big afros, long hair, cornrows and man buns are acceptable at her school

Julie Richardson,  (pictured centre) headteacher at all-boy's Verulam School in St Alban's says big afros, long hair, cornrows and man buns are acceptable at her school

Ridwan, 15, (pictured) with haircut which would have been against rules in past

Ifaz, 16, (pictured) with cornrows which would previously have been against school rules

Ms Richardson has relaxed hair and dress code policies at the school since she took over as its first female headteacher last September

Students have welcomed the changes. Wasif Rashid, 15 said: 'The changes have allowed students to be free to express themselves, embracing who they are.

'We feel accepted and included in the school community and decided to wear our thobes to show this.

'Being able to wear one in the Sixth Form is something that makes me feel I can be myself and that my faith is being respected.'

The policy includes cultural and religious dress such as thobes. Pictured: Ifaz, 15, with a beard and wearing a thobe

Hassan, 15, wearing an ankle-length thobe (pictured)

Sixth form business attire has also been removed from the policy, allowing students to dress professionally but with greater choice

Sixth form business attire has also been removed from the policy, allowing students to dress professionally but with greater choice.  

It includes cultural and religious dress such as ankle length thobes which are commonly worn in the Middle East.  

Ms Richardson added: 'If business men and women in the City are no longer wearing suits and ties why should teenagers in sixth forms?

'It's about having the choice from a list of things deemed professional rather than insisting on one type of clothing.

'Most

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