Louise Smith told police she had been 'raped by a peer' one year before she was ...

Louise Smith told police she had been 'raped by a peer' one year before she was ...
Louise Smith told police she had been 'raped by a peer' one year before she was ...

A murdered 16-year-old girl told police she had been 'raped by one of her peers' a year before she was killed by her uncle, according to a review which criticised officers and social services for failing to protect her during lockdown.

Louise Smith was beaten to death by her uncle, Shane Mays, in a 'sexually motivated attack' on VE Day 2020. The 30-year-old, who defiled her body before setting it on fire, was sentenced to life with a minimum 25 years in prison.

Louise had been monitored by social workers for years and had been on a 'Child in Need Plan' due to her being considered at risk of 'domestic abuse' and 'neglect', a review by the Hampshire Safeguarding Children Partnership found.

Louise Smith was beaten to death by her uncle, Shane Mays, in a 'sexually motivated attack' on VE Day 2020

Louise Smith was beaten to death by her uncle, Shane Mays, in a 'sexually motivated attack' on VE Day 2020

The 30-year-old, who defiled her body before setting it on fire, was sentenced to life with a minimum 25 years in prison

The 30-year-old, who defiled her body before setting it on fire, was sentenced to life with a minimum 25 years in prison

The study, overseen by independent reviewer Jon Chapman, said Louise had reported being raped a year before her death but was told there was not enough evidence to bring charges.

The authors criticised Hampshire Constabulary for the way Louise was informed of the decision, writing: 'The impact of a ''no further action'' decision cannot be underestimated.

'Therefore, when a victim of rape or serious sexual assault is given details of the investigation outcome, wherever feasible, and in agreement with the victim, this would be better done in a supportive, face to face environment with the relevant supporting professional present.

'Other relevant agencies involved with the young person should also be appropriately informed, in order that the necessary support can be given. The impact of Covid on this case should be acknowledged.'

Louise, who had a history of mental health issues and self-harm, had been allowed to move in with Shane Mays and his partner Chazlynn because she was considered 'at risk of homelessness' due to her unstable family home.

The review found that professionals monitoring Louise had been optimistic about her progress, reporting that she had presented in 'a positive way' during the final months of her life.

However, the review said: 'It is plausible that this was creating over optimism and disguised [Louise's] ongoing vulnerability or her ability to effectively utilise the support put in place.'

In fact, the report added Louise 'had gone from a child who would readily engage with professionals, to disengaging at college

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Tuesday 17 May 2022 08:58 AM Millions of households still waiting for £150 council tax rebate, with the ... trends now
NEXT Melbourne murder investigation: Woman found dead at Croydon North home