Grant Shapps vows to punish reckless cyclists under proposed new crime

Grant Shapps vows to punish reckless cyclists under proposed new crime
Grant Shapps vows to punish reckless cyclists under proposed new crime

A man whose wife was killed by a speeding cyclist has welcomed a change in the law which would see reckless riders who cause fatal crashes prosecuted the same way as motorists

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced that cyclists who kill pedestrians could face charges of 'death by dangerous cycling'.

It comes after Matthew Briggs campaigned for the new charge following the death of his wife Kim who was knocked down by reckless cyclist Charlie Alliston.

Alliston was cleared of manslaughter and only convicted of a Victorian era 'furious and wanton driving' charge before he was jailed for 18 months. 

Mr Shapps said he wanted to see cyclists who cause fatal crashes treated the same way as motorists.

He told LBC: 'There's a change that I'm bringing in which is to make sure that we are able to prosecute cyclists who cause death by their own dangerous cycling.

'It's worth noting that I think the injuries and deaths that take place because of cyclists are also unacceptable.' 

Motorists currently face up to 14 years in prison if they are convicted of death by dangerous driving, while death by careless driving carries a maximum sentence of five years.

Following Mr Shapps' announcement, Mr Briggs said he wanted the government to follow through on this 'important commitment' and that he looked forward to working with them to push the law through. 

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced that cyclists who kill pedestrians could face charges of 'death by dangerous cycling'

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced that cyclists who kill pedestrians could face charges of 'death by dangerous cycling'

Kim Briggs died a week after suffering catastrophic injuries after she was knocked down by Charlie Alliston

Kim Briggs died a week after suffering catastrophic injuries after she was knocked down by Charlie Alliston

Mr Briggs also said a 'normal, civilised, democratic society' needs law such as this 'to be able to cope with all eventualities'.

He added: 'What it means to me and I think to my family as well, to my kids, is just a small, tiny degree of something positive coming out of something so tragic.

'We have been through the darkest of times, as many, many other people have, and it will just give us a bit of positivity that we have achieved something through tenacity, persistence and politeness.' 

Mrs Briggs, a 44-year-old HR consultant, suffered 'catastrophic' injuries when Alliston smashed into her with his illegal 'fixie' bike as she crossed Old Street in London in February 2016. She died a week later in hospital.

Alliston later blamed her for the collision in posts online and said she was lucky not to kill him and damage his new bike, which had no front brakes and is meant for use on a velodrome.

The former courier and scaffolder also said she had been on her phone - but it was proved in court she

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