Tuesday 24 May 2022 12:52 AM Kellyanne Conway says Jared Kushner lost Donald Trump the White House in 2020, ... trends now

Tuesday 24 May 2022 12:52 AM Kellyanne Conway says Jared Kushner lost Donald Trump the White House in 2020, ... trends now
Tuesday 24 May 2022 12:52 AM Kellyanne Conway says Jared Kushner lost Donald Trump the White House in 2020, ... trends now

Tuesday 24 May 2022 12:52 AM Kellyanne Conway says Jared Kushner lost Donald Trump the White House in 2020, ... trends now

Jared Kushner lost Donald Trump the White House and presided over a 'wonky mishmash' of a campaign that cost him nearly $2billion and the presidency.

This is Kellyanne Conway's takeaway set down in her new memoir, Here's the Deal.

In the book, seen early by DailyMail.com, Conway, 55, not only eviscerates the former presidential son-in-law, she accuses him of trying to 'rewrite history' by claiming credit for Trump's 2016 win which, she says, was all her.

'I was the one,' the pollster-turned-presidential counselor writes, 'to develop a "secret sauce," to beat a woman for president and help lead Donald Trump in the Oval office,' she writes referencing Trump's 2016 victory over Hillary Clinton.

Should there be any doubt about just who won Trump his seat, Conway takes care to quote the gratitude of others, such as Trump's Vice President Mike Pence who, in the chaotic aftermath of Trump's sensational victory, she recalls, sat down next to Conway and said: 'Kellyanne…none of us would be here without you.'

Kellyanne Conway holds no punches regarding her apparent disdain for former fellow Trump staffer Jared Kushner, in her new memoir, Here's the Deal

Kellyanne Conway holds no punches regarding her apparent disdain for former fellow Trump staffer Jared Kushner, in her new memoir, Here's the Deal 

Conway, who served as the senior counselor to the president from 2017 to 2020, also takes most of the credit for Trump's victory in 2016 and blames Kushner for his 2020 defeat. The two are pictured together on election night in November 2016

Conway, who served as the senior counselor to the president from 2017 to 2020, also takes most of the credit for Trump's victory in 2016 and blames Kushner for his 2020 defeat. The two are pictured together on election night in November 2016  

 In fact, according to Conway: 'Jared didn't have the guts to bring it up to me himself, but Ivanka told me her husband resented all the credit I got for the 2016 election win, while he "had been written out of it".'

Truth be told, if there's anything Ivanka's husband might wish he were written out of, it is Conway's book.

The former Trump campaign manager-turned-senior counselor makes it clear from the get-go that her book, part personal memoir part political chronicle, will not be 'another insufferable 'tell-all' from an author spinning through a cycle of incredulity who has decided to place profit over principle, fame over friendship, attitude over gratitude.'

Here's the Deal, published by Simon and Schuster, will be released on Tuesday, May 24

Here's the Deal, published by Simon and Schuster, will be released on Tuesday, May 24

Safe to say there was no friendship to lose nor gratitude owed to Kushner, 41. 

Because while she eulogizes Trump, 75 – who gave the book his blessing – as a 'generous' promoter of women, she pulls no punches in her assessment of his son-in-law.

When Conway writes: 'Normally, one amasses experience before one amasses power. It was attractive and persuasive to the electorate that President Trump had no Washington experience, but less charming that top members of his 'brain trust' had none,' she has Kushner squarely in her sights.

Conway shows similarly little regard for Steve Bannon – concluding that 'No one stomped around the White House' like he did, 'And no one did less work.'

But while Bannon's luster wore off – the onetime chief strategist survived just seven months of Trump's administration – Kushner remained untouchable and, clearly more irritating to Conway, 'unaccountable', by virtue of his being 'family.'

Jared was 'shrewd and calculating,' according to Conway. 'There was no subject he considered beyond his expertise. Criminal justice reform. Middle East peace. The southern and northern borders. Veterans and opioids. Big Tech and small business.

'If Martian attacks had come across the radar, he would have happily added them to his ever-bulging portfolio. He'd have made sure you knew he'd exiled the Martians to Uranus and insisted he did not care who got credit for it.'

According to Conway, Trump's son-in-law 'carried himself secure in the knowledge that no matter how disastrous a personnel change or legislative attempt may be, he was highly unlikely to be held accountable for it.'

She calls him 'the Duke of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,' and paints him as an almost reptilian presence with 'whispering voice,' and 'unblinking' eyes, 'lingering at a safe distance yet constantly nudging everyone.'

The economy of Kushner's words did not, she writes, 'match the enormity of his power.'

According to Conway, Kushner 'carried himself secure in the knowledge' that he was 'highly unlikely to be held accountable' for the administration's blunders

According to Conway, Kushner 'carried himself secure in the knowledge' that he was 'highly unlikely to be held accountable' for the administration's blunders 

Conway, who initially worked alongside White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon in the early days of Trump's presidency, similarly shows little regard for him

Conway, who initially worked alongside White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon in the early days of Trump's presidency, similarly shows little regard for him 

Kushner, Conway writes, 'was part dreamer, part schemer, dipping in and out of discussions adding himself at will to national security briefings and domestic and international trips, and undertaking secret, impromptu lobbying of his father-in-law in the private residences.'

Ill-fated Chief of Staff and four-star general John Kelly tried to limit that power and Kushner's habit of 'breezing in and out of any meeting he fancied, never taking a single written note.'

Kelly erected a 'full floor-to-ceiling wall with four TVs on it, physically separating the chief of staff suite from Jared Kushner's office, which under John Kelly would be more isolated.'

Conway recalls that she doubled up in laugher when she saw it, declaring: 'You actually built a wall along the West Wing border.'

It did not, however, take long for Kushner to 'figure out how to make two quick right turns into the president's private dining room rather than go through the Outer Oval, where

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