Thursday 26 May 2022 01:19 PM More than 50 high rises still have Grenfell-style cladding five years on trends now

Thursday 26 May 2022 01:19 PM More than 50 high rises still have Grenfell-style cladding five years on trends now
Thursday 26 May 2022 01:19 PM More than 50 high rises still have Grenfell-style cladding five years on trends now

Thursday 26 May 2022 01:19 PM More than 50 high rises still have Grenfell-style cladding five years on trends now

Five years on from the Grenfell Tower disaster, more than 50 high-rise buildings have the same highly-flammable cladding that caused the fire that killed 72 people.

Despite a Government target that all dangerous cladding materials should be removed by June 2020, their latest figures show they are still not there.

In total, 486 buildings over 18 metres tall were found to contain the aluminium composite material (ACM) cladding identified by the Grenfell Inquiry as the leading cause of the 2017 tragedy.

Work is still to be completed on 111 of them while it has not even begun on 31 buildings and 58 still have the cladding intact.

Grenfell Tower, where 72 people were killed when a catastrophic fire tore through the building in June 2017, is covered in protective wrapping and hoardings surround the tower site

Grenfell Tower, where 72 people were killed when a catastrophic fire tore through the building in June 2017, is covered in protective wrapping and hoardings surround the tower site 

An inquiry into the disaster found that the leading cause of the fire was aluminium composite material (ACM) cladding, which the government wanted to remove from all buildings by 2020

An inquiry into the disaster found that the leading cause of the fire was aluminium composite material (ACM) cladding, which the government wanted to remove from all buildings by 2020

The Grenfell Fire, which began with a malfunctioning fridge-freezer on the fourth floor of the block in Kensington and Chelsea, ended up claiming more lives than any other residential fire since the World War II.

Eighteen months later, the Government banned the type of combustible cladding used on Grenfell and vowed to remove what remained.

But plans hit a roadblock as leaseholders in some of the affected buildings were required to pay for the repairs themselves.

This left many of them stuck in a Catch 22 – unable to afford the repairs and unable to sell their properties because of the work required.

Now a deal has been done with Michael Gove, the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, for 35 homebuilders to pay £2 billion to fix the unsafe cladding.

With that, the Government and industry will fully fund the replacement of the cladding, not leaseholders, and firms such as Intelligent FS say they will expand their capacity five-fold to help sort out

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