Wednesday 28 September 2022 08:59 PM Navy SEALs recruits fac strict blood tests after steroids scandal where recruit ... trends now

Wednesday 28 September 2022 08:59 PM Navy SEALs recruits fac strict blood tests after steroids scandal where recruit ... trends now
Wednesday 28 September 2022 08:59 PM Navy SEALs recruits fac strict blood tests after steroids scandal where recruit ... trends now

Wednesday 28 September 2022 08:59 PM Navy SEALs recruits fac strict blood tests after steroids scandal where recruit ... trends now

The Navy has proposed rigorous blood tests among SEAL recruits after a 24-year old SEAL trainee died hours after completing the grueling 'Hell Week.'

Senior Navy officials have asked the Pentagon to approve blood testing to detect potentially illegal or banned substances used by the elite forces.

Seaman Kyle Mullen of Manalapan, New Jersey died on February 4, 2022.     

military autopsy report revealed that the young trainees' cause of death was pneumonia. The report also indicated that Mullen went untreated until it was too late, the news outlet reported.  

But, hours after his death steroids were found in Mullen's car, CNN reported. 

Mullen's mother Regina Mullen told the news outlet that her son did not have PEDs in his system, according to the the toxicology report, but said her son had told her other trainees were using them, the news outlet reported. 

Seaman Kyle Mullen of Manalapan, New Jersey died on February 4, 2022. A military autopsy report revealed that the young trainees' cause of death was pneumonia. The report also indicated that Mullen went untreated until it was too late, the news outlet reported

Mullen was captain of the Yale football team before his departure due to 'personal reasons' in 2018

Mullen was captain of the Yale football team before his departure due to 'personal reasons' in 2018

The underwater exercise is part of the grueling Navy SEAL training. This picture was taken at the Naval Amphibious Base Coronado

The underwater exercise is part of the grueling Navy SEAL training. This picture was taken at the Naval Amphibious Base Coronado

Navy SEAL candidates participate in strength and conditioning training with logs at Naval Special Warfare

Navy SEAL candidates participate in strength and conditioning training with logs at Naval Special Warfare 

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'There was more doing it than not let's just say,' Regina Mullen said. 

Mullen spoke of the training program and the competition the trainees endure, in addition to a significant number of people in the SEALs, she said, 'doing drugs and getting away with it pushed people to their limits,' the news outlet reported

'So many of the men were getting away with it and doing it, so here you have these amazing athletes that don't do it. They get there, and lesser men are beating them in the obstacle course and whatever they do in their drills,' she said. 

Mullen continued: 'They're recovering better and you're not. You almost feel like you want to be on the same playing field.'

Less than  24 hours after Mullen's death, senior officials ordered that the entire SEAL training class undergo urinalysis testing. If testosterone levels were elevated that may determine if PEDs were consumed

The findings revealed that of the 1,000 personnel tested, more than 30 tested positive and were eventually removed from training.   

A naval special warfare senior officer who spoke anonymously, said, 'beyond a reasonable doubt that a significant portion of the candidate population is utilizing a wide range of performance enhancing drugs.'

PEDs can be dangerous and negative for athletes that can cause a number of health issues including increased heart rate, blood pressure, and in some cases strokes.

The use of PEDs goes back decades and have been reportedly used among elite athletes - Arnold Schwarzenegger, Lance Armstrong, Marion Jones.

The most commonly used PEDs are anabolic androgenic steroids, which are known for their ability to build and strengthen muscle as well as reduce body fat.

The Defense Department has not ruled on the request for blood testing, CNN reported,

Senior SEAL officials believe drug use inside the elite unit includes not just human growth hormone but a wide range of substances, but it is unclear, they said,  how many SEALs still may be using PED.  

'When we first heard about possible PED usage we went in extremely fast and extremely hard on testing,' the senior officer said, the news outlet reported.

Candidates are using PED 'because they believe they need it,' the officer added. 'They don't.' 

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PEDs can be dangerous and negative for athletes that can cause a number of health issues including increased heart rate, blood pressure, and in some cases strokes. The most commonly used PEDs are anabolic androgenic steroids, which are known for their ability to build and strengthen muscle as well as reduce body fat

PEDs can be dangerous and negative for athletes that can cause a number of health issues including increased heart rate, blood pressure, and in some cases strokes. The most commonly used PEDs are anabolic androgenic steroids, which are known for their ability to build and strengthen muscle as well as reduce body fat

U.S. Navy SEAL candidates participate in Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training. SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Forces and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air and land

U.S. Navy SEAL candidates participate in Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training. SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Forces and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air and land

The tragic death of Mullen, who had been an all around athlete at his New Jersey high school and football star, has revealed a culture of 'brutality, cheating, and drugs' at BUD/S, with 'dozens' of unnamed SEALs and recent BUD/S graduates

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