Friday 30 September 2022 04:11 PM Russians continue to stream across the border into Georgia fearing Putin's ... trends now

Friday 30 September 2022 04:11 PM Russians continue to stream across the border into Georgia fearing Putin's ... trends now
Friday 30 September 2022 04:11 PM Russians continue to stream across the border into Georgia fearing Putin's ... trends now

Friday 30 September 2022 04:11 PM Russians continue to stream across the border into Georgia fearing Putin's ... trends now

Queueing in their cars and wheeling suitcases along the road, photographs show Russians continuing to stream across the border into Georgia as they fear Putin's mobilisation, even as the despot today delivered a ranting annexation speech in Moscow. 

Roads were jampacked full of traffic as people made a desperate dash for freedom at the Kazbegi border crossing in the Kazbegi municipality of Stepantsminda.

Downcast Russians had packed their cars full of their belongings as they fled Putin's call-up for hundreds of thousands of men to fight in his invasion of Ukraine.

The cars, which had Russian number plates, lined up near parking spots and on the road into Georgia.  

Many appeared to have abandoned their vehicles or opted to flee on foot as they wheeled suitcases along the road. 

Pictured: Masses of cars are seen queueing up on the Georgian border in the latest exodus of Russians from their country

Pictured: Masses of cars are seen queueing up on the Georgian border in the latest exodus of Russians from their country

Russians are seen attempting to leave their country to avoid a military call-up for the Russia-Ukraine war as queues have formed at the Kazbegi border crossing (pictured)

Russians are seen attempting to leave their country to avoid a military call-up for the Russia-Ukraine war as queues have formed at the Kazbegi border crossing (pictured)

STEPANTSMINDA: Roads were jampacked full of traffic and people fleeing on foot as people made a desperate dash for freedom from Russia at the Kazbegi border crossing in the Kazbegi municipality of Stepantsminda

STEPANTSMINDA: Roads were jampacked full of traffic and people fleeing on foot as people made a desperate dash for freedom from Russia at the Kazbegi border crossing in the Kazbegi municipality of Stepantsminda

Russians are seen attempting to leave their country to avoid a military call-up for the Russia-Ukraine war as queues have formed at the Kazbegi border crossing

Russians are seen attempting to leave their country to avoid a military call-up for the Russia-Ukraine war as queues have formed at the Kazbegi border crossing

A Russian girl is seen driving to the border with a car packed full of her belongings (pictured)

A Russian girl is seen driving to the border with a car packed full of her belongings (pictured)

The cars continued to stream through to the Georgian border, pictured, even as Putin made his latest speech about annexing four Ukrainian regions after a sham ballot

The cars continued to stream through to the Georgian border, pictured, even as Putin made his latest speech about annexing four Ukrainian regions after a sham ballot 

The latest mass exodus from Russia came as Putin today announced in a Kremlin speech that he has annexed four Ukrainian regions to Russia.

He vowed to 'smash' the West and liberate the world, raising fears he is gearing up to deploy Moscow's huge nuclear arsenal.

The Russian leader, speaking in front of a large crowd of his supporters in Moscow, declared that 'millions of people' had 'opted' to become vassals of Russia after staging sham referendums in which gun-toting troops went door-to-door with clear glass ballot boxes in order to force people to vote.

'They are our people, forever,' he said to a standing ovation inside the Kremlin's grand Georgian Hall before calling on Ukraine and its Western allies to abandon hopes of re-taking them, repeating a threat to use 'all forces' to defend 'Russia's new territories'.

Vladimir Putin announced the annexation of four Ukrainian regions to Russia during a speech at the Kremlin, in which he also delivered a blistering tirade against the West

Vladimir Putin announced the annexation of four Ukrainian regions to Russia during a speech at the Kremlin, in which he also delivered a blistering tirade against the West

Putin chants 'Russia' with the puppet 'leaders' of the four Ukrainian regions he now claims are part of his country, vowing to use 'all forces' to defend them - raising the fear he will resort to nukes

The speech was delivered inside the Kremlin's grand Georgian Hall in front of hundreds of Putin's henchmen, including the likes of Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu, warlord Ramzan Kadyrov, and spy chief Sergey Naryshkin

The speech was delivered inside the Kremlin's grand Georgian Hall in front of hundreds of Putin's henchmen, including the likes of Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu, warlord Ramzan Kadyrov, and spy chief Sergey Naryshkin

He then turned his sights on the West, recalling the horrors of both world wars, Korea, and Vietnam; the US nuclear strikes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki; making homophobic jibes and accusing westerners of being 'Satanists'; vowing 'Western hegemony will be smashed' and speaking of Russia's 'destiny' to liberate the world.

Putin said the US had created 'precedent' to use nukes, slammed Allied bombing campaigns against Nazi Germany, spoke of the horrors of colonialism and the Opium Wars, said Germany, Korea and Japan are being 'occupied' by America even now, and ranted about sex changes.

His promise to protect his 'new territories' will be put to an almost-immediate test as thousands of Russian troops are currently thought to be encircled in Lyman, in the Donetsk region, with the city on the verge of falling and the troops either being captured or killed in the process - possibly within the next few hours.

Putin is given a standing ovation by his cronies as he delivers a blistering speech in the Kremlin in which he spoke of Russia's 'destiny' to liberate the world from what he called 'neo-colonialism'

Putin is given a standing ovation by his cronies as he delivers a blistering speech in the Kremlin in which he spoke of Russia's 'destiny' to liberate the world from what he called 'neo-colonialism'

Chechen warlord Ramzan Kadyrov, a staunch ally of Putin, is pictured with Russian State Duma member Adam Delimkhanov (centre) and Chechen Parliament Chairman Magomed Daudov (left) during the speech

Chechen warlord Ramzan Kadyrov, a staunch ally of Putin, is pictured with Russian State Duma member Adam Delimkhanov (centre) and Chechen Parliament Chairman Magomed Daudov (left) during the speech

Putin officially signs a decree accepting the four occupied regions of Ukraine as new territories of Russia, paving the way for him to escalate his war against his ex-Soviet neighbour

Putin officially signs a decree accepting the four occupied regions of Ukraine as new territories of Russia, paving the way for him to escalate his war against his ex-Soviet neighbour

Russians have fled to Georgia and other neighbouring countries in their droves as their fears grow over Putin and his war. 

Just days ago, more photographs showed the mass exodus in action, with men, women and children seen pulling luggage beside cars with Russian licence plates parked at the Georgian side of the Verkhni Lars customs checkpoint some 125 miles outside Tbilisi.

Elsewhere, anti-war protests erupted, with brave women in the Dagestani capital of Makhachkala, one of Russia's poorest regions, holding placards and shouting 'no to war' as they faced down the Kremlin's shock troops- even as riot police fired warning shots into the air to frighten them.

And now even the Russian dictator's allies are blaming the regime's cack-handed handling of the failed invasion, brutal clampdown on civil liberties since February 24 and forcible conscription of reservists for the exodus and the scale of the protests which have erupted across the country.

Those fleeing walk past vehicles with Russian licence plates near the Nizhniy Lars customs checkpoint between Georgia and Russia

Those fleeing walk past vehicles with Russian licence plates near the Nizhniy Lars customs checkpoint between Georgia and Russia

Russians fled the country on foot in the pouring rain, while thousands of cars queued up at the border

Russians fled the country on foot in the pouring rain, while thousands of cars queued up at the border

Thousands have opted to instead flee to neighbouring countries, with photos showing people dragging suitcases across the Georgian border

Thousands have opted to instead flee to neighbouring countries, with photos showing people dragging suitcases across the Georgian border

The Speaker of Putin's puppet parliament Valentina Matvienko said the use of force - including stun guns and truncheons - by officers pressing people into the Russian Army was 'absolutely unacceptable', adding: 'I consider it absolutely right that they are triggering a sharp reaction in society.'

Putin's riot police have arrested more than 2,000 anti-war protesters this week after the increasingly panicked and irrational dictator announced a mobilisation order and held the world to ransom by threatening to use nuclear weapons against Ukraine and the West.

Those fleeing, wearing ponchos and raincoats, were seen walking past vehicles with Russian licence plates near the Nizhniy Lars customs checkpoint between Georgia and Russia.  

Russian authorities acknowledged a 'significant' influx of cars trying to cross from Russia into Georgia, with one official saying there is 'significant congestion of private vehicles... around 2,300'. 

Zelensky claims Putin's rush to conscript '1million' men is proof Russian army 'is not able to fight' 

Ukraine's president today spoke of how Russia's rush to mobilise hundreds of thousands of recruits is a tacit acknowledgement that its 'army is not able to fight'.

Speaking to U.S. broadcaster CBS, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy also said he's bracing for more Russian strikes on Ukraine's electrical infrastructure, as the Kremlin seeks to ramp up the pressure on Ukraine and its Western backers as the weather gets colder. Zelenskyy warned that this winter 'will be very difficult.'

'They will shoot missiles, and they will target our electric grid. This is a challenge, but we are not afraid of that,' he said.

He portrayed the Russian mobilisation - its first such call-up since World War II - as a signal of weakness, not strength, saying: 'They admitted that their army is not able to fight with Ukraine anymore.'

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