Thursday 6 October 2022 12:19 PM Frog in your throat! Incredible moment three-foot grass snake devours its prey ... trends now

Thursday 6 October 2022 12:19 PM Frog in your throat! Incredible moment three-foot grass snake devours its prey ... trends now
Thursday 6 October 2022 12:19 PM Frog in your throat! Incredible moment three-foot grass snake devours its prey ... trends now

Thursday 6 October 2022 12:19 PM Frog in your throat! Incredible moment three-foot grass snake devours its prey ... trends now

Frog in your throat! Incredible moment three-foot grass snake devours its prey in a Kent marshland is pictured Retired gas engineer Steve Cullum, 69, captured the moment a grass snake caught a marsh frog tadpole The doomed frog, caught at Oare Marshes Nature Reserve, Kent was mistaken for a fish due to its thickness Mr Cullum recalled the grass snake diving into the waters before rising up with the frog between its fangs  The reptiles are Britain's largest snake and are known to eat amphibians, fish, small mammals and birds

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This is the incredible moment a a three-foot grass snake was pictured ruthlessly devouring a helpless large marsh frog tadpole for its next meal.

The snake was spotted diving into the marshes before rising from the waters with the enormous amphibian which it caught between its fangs. 

The doomed marsh frog, which was pictured being devoured at Oare Marshes Nature Reserve in Kent, was initially mistaken for a fish because of the 'thickness of it'. 

This is the incredible moment a three-foot grass snake was pictured catching a helpless large marsh frog tadpole

This is the incredible moment a three-foot grass snake was pictured catching a helpless large marsh frog tadpole

The frog was devoured at Oare Marshes Nature Reserve (pictured) in Kent which is home to thousands of species including the Chinese water deer, Leisler's bat and the palmate newt

The frog was devoured at Oare Marshes Nature Reserve (pictured) in Kent which is home to thousands of species including the Chinese water deer, Leisler's bat and the palmate newt

The doomed marsh frog was initially mistaken for a fish by retired gas engineer Steve Cullum, 69, because of the 'thickness of it'

 The doomed marsh frog was initially mistaken for a fish by retired gas engineer Steve Cullum, 69, because of the 'thickness of it'

Although they are not easily spotted, a retired gas engineer was on hand to capture the moment at the perfect point.

Steve Cullum, 69, said: 'The snakes are generally well hidden but I saw this one dive into the marsh and come up with the large catch.

The photographer from Meopham, Kent, added: 'We initially thought it was a fish because of the thickness of it

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