What you should NEVER do on Australia Day trends now

What you should NEVER do on Australia Day trends now
What you should NEVER do on Australia Day trends now

What you should NEVER do on Australia Day trends now

Social media influencers are using their platforms to share tips on how young people can support First Nations people on Australia Day - and the activities revellers should avoid.

January 26 - which marks the raising of the British flag on Australian soil in 1788 after the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Harbour - is regarded as 'invasion day' by many First Nations people.

In viral videos, popular creators have made 'tutorials' offering advice to their thousands of followers on approaching the day with cultural sensitivity.

Their suggestions include declining Australia Day party invitations and donating wages to charity if you have to work on the day.

Wiradjuri, Gomeroi and Awabakal user Meissa Mason (pictured) has suggested people working on 'Invasion Day', who wish to support Indigenous people, donate their bonus public holiday rates

Wiradjuri, Gomeroi and Awabakal user Meissa Mason (pictured) has suggested people working on 'Invasion Day', who wish to support Indigenous people, donate their bonus public holiday rates 

Wiradjuri, Gomeroi and Awabakal user Meissa Mason, who boasts more than 110,000 followers, encouraged those who work on Australia Day to give their additional earnings to charity.

'I’ve had a couple of people DM me and say that they don’t celebrate Invasion Day, and they’d rather work, but they also feel uncomfortable profiting off Invasion Day by getting time-and-a-half or double rates,' she said.

'Something you can do is working out your payslips to see what you got on your regular rates, and then taking that percentage that you got for double pay or pay-and-a-half and donating it to an Indigenous organisation, movement or group.

'That way you are not profiting off of Invasion Day and you are directly supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.'

Barkindji, Wakawaka and Birrigubba Tiktok influencer Emily Johnson shared a 'tutorial' titled 'no pride in genocide', showing her 78,000 followers how to decline invitations to events held on the public holiday.

'For me personally, it’s ok if you want to enjoy the public holiday, but titling your event "Invasion Day" is just yuck,' she wrote in a caption.

Non-Indigenous activist Ella Jae offered her 60,200 followers a 'reminder' we should not 'celebrate genocide', calling for the date to be changed from January 26 to May 8.

Barkindji, Wakawaka and Birrigubba Tiktok influencer Emily Johnson (pictured) shared a tutorial on how to turn down Australia Day party invitations

She said: 'For me personally it’s ok if you want to enjoy the public holiday, but titling your event

Barkindji, Wakawaka and Birrigubba Tiktok influencer Emily Johnson (pictured) shared a tutorial on how to turn down Australia Day party invitations

'If we want to celebrate Australia it should be on a day that's inclusive for everyone so that everyone can have fun,' she said in the video which has been seen more than 100,000 times. 

She compared having a party on Australia Day to skipping a loved one's funeral and going straight to 'kick ons' and refuted common argument atrocities against Indigenous people 'happened so long ago'.

'Trauma tracks down through generations, that pain is still felt by First Nation people's children, grandchildren, great grandchildren,' she said.

'And second, you do not get to decide what is offensive or hurtful to a community that you are not a part of.

'If you choose to be ignorant and not get educated, you are part of the problem.' 

Change-the-date advocate Jaz Karati, described how she and her Maori family used to celebrate the public holiday until

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