UK shoppers' fury at latest products to go DOWN in size while going UP in price  trends now

UK shoppers' fury at latest products to go DOWN in size while going UP in price  trends now
UK shoppers' fury at latest products to go DOWN in size while going UP in price  trends now

UK shoppers' fury at latest products to go DOWN in size while going UP in price  trends now

As Brits continue to count every penny during the cost-of-living crisis, savvy shoppers are becoming ever more aware of the phenomenon of 'shrinkflation'. 

Many family favorites including Ritz biscuits, butter and shortbread fingers have all become victim to this sneaky practice.

Now social media have slammed popular brands for downsizing products while maintaining or increasing its price to stealthily boost profit margins or maintain them in the face of rising input costs.

Brits are already battling rising gas, electric, fuel costs and the overall uncertainty of the economy - with the Bank of England raising interest rates by a quarter of a point to 4.5% on Thursday

And in a huge blow to many households, it forecast inflation would stay higher for longer than previously expected and the economy would perform more strongly. 

Angry shoppers are fuming on Twitter, and have called on manufacturers and companies to be honest with consumers about their deceptive packaging. 

And families and household have been left wondering which product will be affected next.

So here's how shrinkflation is affecting you and your favourite products recently...

Here are four product that have increased in price in Tesco, but decreased in size over the past few years. It is not just foods that have been affected by shrinkflation, but health and beauty products too

Recent examples include Jacobs Mini Cheddars BBQ increasing by 25 pence in price, and decreasing by two grams in weight.

Other shoppers have noticed that their favourite savoury biscuits have shrunk by 73 grams - that's nearly 30 per cent - while remaining the same in cost.

And the same goes for Nestle cereals, specifically the gluten free honey hoops, that have now shrunk in size and have had nuts added to them.

Tesco shoppers also shared on Twitter that they have noticed a few of their items have shrunk, and also grown in price.

These include Paterson's shortbread fingers that used to be £1 for an 380g packet. They are now £1.25 for a pack that has decreased to 300g. 

And loyal customers of that big four supermarket have also realised that Tesco's six lemon case slices have decreased in weight, from 174g to 160g. However, the price has increased from 95 pence to £1.05.

Sweet treats, in particular Reese's peanut butter cups, are another item that Brits have noticed have shrunk 'again'. One irritated customer wrote on Twitter that they have noticed they are being charged more but the product is smaller, adding that they 'can't keep up with the cost of groceries.'

People have complained on Twitter that they have started to notice their favourite products in supermarkets have shrunk in size but increased in price, as they are calling on manufacturers to be honest with consumers about their deceptive packaging

People have complained on Twitter that they have started to notice their favourite products in supermarkets have shrunk in size but increased in price, as they are calling on manufacturers to be honest with consumers about their deceptive packaging

Meanwhile, both Asda and Sainsbury's shoppers have found that the price of butter is growing exponentially - while the weight remains the same or is decreasing.

One angry shopper wrote on Twitter that they noticed their local Asda store in Llansamlet, Wales has falsely advertised the weight and cost of their butter.

They wrote: 'Llansamlet store sell Lurpak 250g for £1.90- but the butter itself is only 200g. Needed 1kg, so ended up 200g down for a specific recipe. Went back and checked in store and all the labels state 250g, yet all the butters are 200g. False advertisement?'

While a Sainsbury's customer was left dumbfounded at the increased cost per kilo of butter, writing on Twitter: 'nearly bought the anchor 200g, then I noticed the £9 a kilo , I'd prefer it stayed the same weight, be like a fredo soon how butter is measured.'

This comes after a shopper noticed that a 600g tub of Lurpak worth £5.35 was locked up in security netting in an Aldi store in Kidbrooke, south-east London.

Since last year, shrinkflation has meant that a

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