Almost two-fifths of civil servants are considering quitting their Whitehall ... trends now

Almost two-fifths of civil servants are considering quitting their Whitehall ... trends now
Almost two-fifths of civil servants are considering quitting their Whitehall ... trends now

Almost two-fifths of civil servants are considering quitting their Whitehall ... trends now

Almost two-fifths of civil servants are considering quitting their Whitehall jobs after being told they will have to spend at least three days a week in the office.

A survey by the PCS union, which has already been completed by 13,000 members, showed a huge backlash against a crackdown on working from home habits.

Whitehall officials were recently told to spend 60 per cent of their time in the office or on official business, rather than at home.

Meanwhile, senior managers and those who are early into their careers were told they will be expected to spend more than three days a week in the office.

But the survey by the PCS union, which represents civil servants, showed 39.43 per cent of members are considering leaving the civil service following the announcement.

Almost two-fifths of civil servants are considering quitting their Whitehall jobs after being told they will have to spend at least three days a week in the office

Almost two-fifths of civil servants are considering quitting their Whitehall jobs after being told they will have to spend at least three days a week in the office 

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has stressed his belief in the 'importance' of face to face working for officials and a need to make full use of Whitehall office space.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has stressed his belief in the 'importance' of face to face working for officials and a need to make full use of Whitehall office space. 

Sir Jacob Rees-Mogg ran a long campaign to get Whitehall staff back to their offices when he was a Cabinet minister. This included leaving notes on empty desks across departments

Sir Jacob Rees-Mogg ran a long campaign to get Whitehall staff back to their offices when he was a Cabinet minister. This included leaving notes on empty desks across departments 

Among those with caring responsibilities, 58.71 per cent of respondents said it would place them under more stress and mean they would be less able to look after those they care for.

There were also concerns about inequality, as 39.75 per cent said they felt being forced to attend the office more frequently would disadvantage them because of their sex, disability or age.

More than four-fifths (82.43 per cent) said that hybrid working had made them more productive.

The survey of PCS members only opened last Friday and will be running until 8 December.

One member said: 'As a peri-menopausal woman, I may struggle to meet 60 per cent as there are certain times of the month I would be much more comfortable working from home.'

Another said: 'Moving to more time in the office would mean more time commuting, extra costs for me, and would limit my ability to look after a relative who has been receiving

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