Government will respond today to report into Hillsborough football disaster ... trends now

Government will respond today to report into Hillsborough football disaster ... trends now
Government will respond today to report into Hillsborough football disaster ... trends now

Government will respond today to report into Hillsborough football disaster ... trends now

The Government has refused to introduce a Hillsborough Law called for by campaigners in its response to a report into the experiences of the bereaved families six years after it was first published.

Former bishop of Liverpool the Right Rev James Jones set out 25 learning points in his report The Patronising Disposition of Unaccountable Power, published in November 2017 following inquests into the deaths at the 1989 FA Cup semi-final in Sheffield - where 97 Liverpool FC fans died.

In a response published on Wednesday, the Government said it had signed up to a Hillsborough Charter, pledging to place the public interest above its own reputation, but said a 'Hillsborough Law' incorporating a legal duty of candour was not necessary.

In the foreword to the report, Home Secretary James Cleverly and Justice Secretary Alex Chalk acknowledged the response had taken 'too long, compounding the agony of the Hillsborough families and survivors'.

Former Bishop of Liverpool the Right Reverend James Jones published the review in November 2017

Former Bishop of Liverpool the Right Reverend James Jones published the review in November 2017

Supporters and police help carry injured fans away from the scene of the crush in April 1989

Supporters and police help carry injured fans away from the scene of the crush in April 1989

They added: 'For this we are deeply sorry.'

What did the landmark 2017 Hillsborough disaster report find? 

25 'essential' learning points were found in The Rt Revd James Jones's The Patronising Disposition of Unaccountable Power report.

His 117-page report, commissioned by the then home secretary Theresa May, detailed the response of those in power to the bereaved families of Hillsborough victims in the years following the disaster. 

The former Bishop of Liverpool highlighted a 'change in attitude' was required to ensure the 'pain and suffering' of relatives of those who died was never repeated. 

He said at the time: 'The experience of Hillsborough families demonstrates the need for a substantial change in the culture of public bodies.

'I suggest that the way in which families bereaved through public tragedy are treated by those in authority is in itself a burning injustice which must be addressed.' 

Among his recommendations, were the implementation of a 'duty of candour' for police officers, a charter for families bereaved by public tragedy and greater participation of grieving families at inquests.

The right to publicly funded legal representation was also suggested.

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Prime Minister Rishi Sunak said: 'The Hillsborough families have suffered multiple injustices and more than 34 years later there can never be too many apologies for what they have been through.

'And I want to repeat that apology today and thank the Hillsborough families for their tenacity, patience and

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