Shamima Begum's life in camp: ISIS bride faces future in Syrian detention ... trends now

Shamima Begum's life in camp: ISIS bride faces future in Syrian detention ... trends now
Shamima Begum's life in camp: ISIS bride faces future in Syrian detention ... trends now

Shamima Begum's life in camp: ISIS bride faces future in Syrian detention ... trends now

Shamima Begum's latest legal loss means she is likely to spend the foreseeable future in the Syrian refugee camp she has called home for several years.

Ms Begum, 24, remains condemned to live in the al-Roj camp in northern Syria, where conditions have been described by the Red Cross as 'extremely volatile', after losing an appeal against the decision to revoke her British citizenship.

The Londoner was a Primark-loving 15-year-old when she travelled to Istanbul in Turkey from Gatwick Airport to join ISIS with her close friends at Bethnal Green Academy - Kadiza Sultana, 16, and Amira Abase, 15, in 2015.

She now faces an uncertain future in the al-Roj camp, where she was moved after being discovered in another camp in 2019. Her refusal to disavow ISIS after being found led to the Home Office revoking her citizenship for national security reasons.

A Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SAIC) ruling upheld the decision to strip her of her citizenship as lawful, while a Court of Appeal judgement was issued today that has doubled down on the SAIC's ruling.

Shamima Begum is living in the al-Roj refugee camp in northern Syria, where she has been for several years - and will likely remain there after her latest appeal for UK citizenship failed

Shamima Begum is living in the al-Roj refugee camp in northern Syria, where she has been for several years - and will likely remain there after her latest appeal for UK citizenship failed

The camp is one of several refugee camps in Syria, and was set up for those displaced by ISIS. It now holds thousands of suspected ISIS fanatics

The camp is one of several refugee camps in Syria, and was set up for those displaced by ISIS. It now holds thousands of suspected ISIS fanatics

Living conditions in the camp are reported to be poor, with people living in tents and only simple medical facilities available

Living conditions in the camp are reported to be poor, with people living in tents and only simple medical facilities available 

Begum was moved to al-Roj from the al-Hol camp where she was discovered in February 2019 following reported threats to her life (file photo of a woman walking through the camp)

Begum was moved to al-Roj from the al-Hol camp where she was discovered in February 2019 following reported threats to her life (file photo of a woman walking through the camp) 

Ms Begum is living in the Al-Roj refugee camp, having been found at the Al-Hol camp to the south in 2019

Ms Begum is living in the Al-Roj refugee camp, having been found at the Al-Hol camp to the south in 2019

Shamima Begum appearing in a 2021 interview from al-Roj, where she begged for forgiveness and insisted she was a victim - not a terrorist or a criminal

Shamima Begum appearing in a 2021 interview from al-Roj, where she begged for forgiveness and insisted she was a victim - not a terrorist or a criminal

The former East London schoolgirl wore a black niqab and headscarves in her earlier media appearances

The former East London schoolgirl wore a black niqab and headscarves in her earlier media appearances

She has since undergone a startling transformation, taking on a more Western appearance, as she continues her fight to be allowed back into Britain

She has since undergone a startling transformation, taking on a more Western appearance, as she continues her fight to be allowed back into Britain 

Ms Begum, then aged 15, was filmed on CCTV walking through a security gate at Gatwick

Ms Begum, then aged 15, was filmed on CCTV walking through a security gate at Gatwick 

Begum was just 15 years old when she ran away to Syria to join ISIS with two friends from school

Just ten days after arriving she was married to a Dutchman named Yago Riedijk and the couple had three children

The former jihadi bride has been battling to come back to Britain since 2019 after she was discovered in a Syrian refugee camp

Ms Begum's lawyers look set to seek permission to take the case to the Supreme Court, but for the time being any hopes of her returning to the UK seem as distant as ever. 

She is likely to continue languishing in the al-Roj camp where she has been for a number of years, as a result - after being moved from the al-Hol cap to the south following reported threats to her life.

Ms Begum has previously compared life at the camp to being 'worse than prison' because: 'At least with prison sentences you know that there will be an end but here you don't know if there's going to be an end.'

When she was first discovered at the al-Hol camp in 2019, the ISIS bride was pictured in a black hijab - a headscarf that leaves the face uncovered - but since relocating, she has adopted a more Westernised image.

She has been photographed walking around al-Roj in Primark clothes and Nike trainers, and wearing her hair down - having reportedly had it cut by a fellow jihadi bride in the camp.

She has also taken to wearing make-up that was reportedly smuggled in by some of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) soldiers guarding the gates of the facility, which is home to ISIS converts and their families

Filmmaker Andrew Drury, who knew her for 18 months, said she was also able to get her hands on clothes and make-up from broadcasters courting her for interviews - as well as a camp shop selling fake designer goods sourced from local markets.

'There's a shopping area in the camp with six or seven shops selling things like clothes, food and toys,' he told MailOnline last year.

''The clothes shop is opened up to the extremist and non-extremist girls at different times.

'They get fake Nikes and other western brands that probably come from local markets.'

Mr Drury said inmates funded their shopping with money sent by their families or earned from cash-in-hand tasks around the camp.

'Like teenagers they love hanging around the shop and chatting even though they're not allowed to,' he said.

'I didn't spend too long in the shop myself because I was trying to get her out of there so she could do interviews.'

He said Begum's other clothes were mainly given to her by broadcasters wanting to interview her.

'Every time you want to do an interview you ask her what she wants,' he said.

'Other clothes have probably been donated by their friends or smuggled in by the guards.'

Begum would also get fashion advice from other Western extremist converts to ISIS, and they would give her haircuts, he added.

International observers say people living at the al-Roj camp are effectively detained by Syrian forces - unable to leave without a guarantee of repatriation to their home countries

International observers say people living at the al-Roj camp are effectively detained by Syrian forces - unable to leave without a guarantee of repatriation to their home countries

Women stand around at the Al-Roj prison camp as they wait for clothes to dry outside

Women stand around at the Al-Roj prison camp as they wait for clothes to dry outside 

Around 2,500 people were estimated to live in the camp in 2021, according to UN children's agency UNICEF - and of those, half were children.

Al-Roj was first established to welcome families fleeing Iraq, before accepting Syrians as ISIS engaged in battles with domestic armed forces as it sought to establish a new 'caliphate' governed under Islamic rule across the Middle East.

It is guarded by the SDF and living standards are basic - with most people living in tents. 

International observers say people living there are effectively detained, with permission only given to leave if arrangements are secured to allow them to return to their original homes.

In a 2021 report, Save the Children claimed only the most basic medical services were available on site - with emergency treatment only possible by leaving the camp to travel to local hospitals. 

It said that almost half of the children whose parents and guardians it interviewed at the camp were 'always, or usually, upset'.

Meanwhile, Dr Marianne Wade, a reader in criminal justice at Birmingham Law School, said Ms Begum's legal team would seek an appeal. 

She told MailOnline: 'Her team will it seems fight on. Despite her public notoriety, they likely also see value in continuing to force the public to ask themselves whether it is right that a - as they see her - vulnerable, groomed and exploited 15 year old should be judged as she has been and have to suffer such harsh, life-long consequences. 

'This is perhaps as much a political as legal argument and at its heart a battle between the Government and judiciary.

'For Shamima Begum, of course, it is considerably more urgent than this evergreen, theoretical debate.'

She was originally able to cross the Syrian border with the help of a Canadian spy named Mohammed Al Rasheed, according to reports.

In a BBC podcast series, she said she was told to 'pack nice clothes so you can dress nicely for your husband'.

Just ten days after arriving in the city of Raqqa, Ms Begum, who is of Bangladeshi heritage, was married to a Dutchman named Yago Riedijk, who had converted to Islam.

They had three children together, who all later died from malnourishment or disease. They were a one-year-old girl, a three-month-old boy and newborn son.

One of the key questions in Ms Begum's story is how much she knew about ISIS atrocities before deciding to join.

In a 2019 interview, the BBC 's Middle East correspondent, Quentin Sommerville, asked if the terror group's 'beheading videos' were one of the things that attracted her.

She replied: 'Not just the beheading videos, the videos that show families and stuff in the park. The good life that they can provide for you. Not just the fighting videos, but yeah the fighting videos as well I guess.'

Begum was 15 when she ran away with Kadiza Sultana, 16, and Amira Abase, 15 (they were all pictured at Gatwick airport in 2015)

Begum was 15 when she ran away with Kadiza Sultana, 16, and Amira Abase, 15 (they were all pictured at Gatwick airport in 2015) 

Appearing later on BBC podcast The Shamima Begum Story, she claimed she had not been aware of ISIS atrocities and 'fell in love' with the idea of the terror group as a 'utopia'.

She said she was told to 'pack nice clothes so you can dress nicely for your husband'. 

The podcast described how Ms Begum was transferred from Turkey to ISIS-controlled Syria by a smuggler called Mohammed Al Rashed - who at that

read more from dailymail.....

NEXT Doctors first 'dismissed' this young girl's cancer symptom before her parents ... trends now