Minute-by-minute, Operation Bomb: How nerve-shredding operation to retrieve WW2 ... trends now

Minute-by-minute, Operation Bomb: How nerve-shredding operation to retrieve WW2 ... trends now
Minute-by-minute, Operation Bomb: How nerve-shredding operation to retrieve WW2 ... trends now

Minute-by-minute, Operation Bomb: How nerve-shredding operation to retrieve WW2 ... trends now

After lying underground for more than 80 years, the dramatic unearthing of an unexploded Second World War bomb has caused chaos in Plymouth.

The Nazi weapon was discovered in the back garden of a terraced house in the Keyham area of the city earlier this week, and since then has forced more than 10,000 people to leave their homes amid fears it could explode.

It has caused a massive military response, with branches of the Army, Royal Navy and the police being called into action to plan a remarkable operation to dispose of it safely.

On Friday people across the world turned their gaze on the Devon port city as the device was painstakingly transported from the hole where it has remained since 1941 onto a boat which took it to sea.

The bomb has since found its resting place at the bottom of the English Channel, after it was detonated in a controlled explosion underwater last night.

But how did it have reach its watery grave? MailOnline has created a moment by moment timeline of the ordnance's nerve-shredding journey. 

The Second World War German bomb found which was found in the back garden in Plymouth, Devon. Pictured: The bomb after it was first found

The Second World War German bomb found which was found in the back garden in Plymouth, Devon. Pictured: The bomb after it was first found

The bomb was uncovered by Ian Jary while he was digging the foundations for an extension to his daughter's kitchen. Pictured: The bomb after it was uncovered in the back garden

The bomb was uncovered by Ian Jary while he was digging the foundations for an extension to his daughter's kitchen. Pictured: The bomb after it was uncovered in the back garden 

Thursday, February 15 - the bomb is discovered 

The device which has caused large parts of Plymouth to grind to a halt in recent days was found in the back garden of a home in St Michael Avenue, in the Keyham area of the city.

The bomb, which is believed to have been dropped on the city by the Nazis in 1941, was uncovered by Ian Jary, an undersea drilling expert who was helping dig the foundations for the kitchen extension at his daughter's home.

Speaking exclusively to MailOnline, Mr Jary revealed he had actually hit the device with his spade, before heavy rain and further excavation revealed its dangerous nature in following days.

He said: 'We've been digging out for the foundations for an extension. Every time we reached what we thought was hard ground the rain would come and we'd find we had to keep digging down.

'We actually found it about a week ago. It was just outside the building line and the building inspector said we needed trench of around 650mm. I hit something with a spade but we weren't sure what it was at first.

'Since then we've had so much rain, the bank collapsed, then there was more rain on Friday and it's been revealed more and more.'

Residents inside the 309-metre cordon were forced to take precious belongings on Thursday, February 22

Residents inside the 309-metre cordon were forced to take precious belongings on Thursday, February 22

Police and bomb disposals experts stand near a cordon during Friday's massive operation in Plymouth

Police and bomb disposals experts stand near a cordon during Friday's massive operation in Plymouth 

Tuesday, February 20 - the police are called and 1,000 people evacuated

On Tuesday Mr Jary contacted the police and sent them a photo, setting off a chain of events that would thrust the port city into the national limelight.

'I took photos and sent them off and a sergeant in Exeter rang me in five minutes saying he needed to send them off to EOD,' he said.

'Five minutes later there's a knock on the door and police officers asking to have a look. The next minute they're suggesting a cordon with a 200m radius.'

This was duly put in place, so while bomb disposal experts from the Army and Royal Navy took a closer look at the device, around 1,000 people in the surrounding area were asked to leave their homes.

Officers told those who were forced to leave to stay with family or friends if they could, but those who had nowhere to go were allowed to stay at a nearby library and local community centres. 

More homes would be evacuated two days later when police extended the cordon to 300m on Thursday morning.

Bomb disposal experts decided to ship the bomb offshore rather than try and detonate it on land. They plotted a route to get it from the terraced street it was found on, to the English Channel

Bomb disposal experts decided to ship the bomb offshore rather

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