Inside the rise of In-N-Out Burger: Billionaire heiress to iconic fast-food ... trends now

Inside the rise of In-N-Out Burger: Billionaire heiress to iconic fast-food ... trends now
Inside the rise of In-N-Out Burger: Billionaire heiress to iconic fast-food ... trends now

Inside the rise of In-N-Out Burger: Billionaire heiress to iconic fast-food ... trends now

The billionaire heiress of In-N-Out has revealed the secrets behind the family's tragic history of drug abuse, shock deaths and a brutal legal battle inside the company. 

Lynsi Snyder, 41, recently authored a book, The Ins-N-Outs of In-N-Out Burger, delving into the iconic burger chain's history and unveiling the secret recipes behind its fan-favorite items that have remained unchanged for the past 70 years.

Snyder, who became the president of In-N-Out in 2010 and inherited full control of the company in 2017, is one of the youngest billionaires with a $4.2 billion net worth.

Since its founding in California by Snyder's grandparents, Harry and Esther Snyder, which started as a small drive-thru burger stand, it has gradually expanded to one of the most lucrative food chains with more than 400 locations across the country.

But what lies behind the rise of In-N-Out burger are struggles with drug and alcohol addiction, a history of child abuse and shocking deaths of family members.

Scroll down to see the secret recipes of In-N-Out 

The billionaire heiress of In-N-Out, Lynsi Snyder, 41, revealed the secrets behind the family's tragic history of drug abuse, abrupt deaths, and a brutal legal battle inside the company

The billionaire heiress of In-N-Out, Lynsi Snyder, 41, revealed the secrets behind the family's tragic history of drug abuse, abrupt deaths, and a brutal legal battle inside the company

Snyder, who became the president of In-N-Out in 2010 and inherited full control of the company in 2017, is one of the youngest billionaires with a $4.2 billion net worth

Snyder, who became the president of In-N-Out in 2010 and inherited full control of the company in 2017, is one of the youngest billionaires with a $4.2 billion net worth

Since its founding in California by Snyder's grandparents, Harry (right) and Esther Snyder (left), which started as a small drive-thru burger stand, it has gradually expanded to one of the most lucrative food chains with more than 400 locations across the country

Since its founding in California by Snyder's grandparents, Harry (right) and Esther Snyder (left), which started as a small drive-thru burger stand, it has gradually expanded to one of the most lucrative food chains with more than 400 locations across the country

Harry, a child of Dutch immigrants, served as a clerk in the army's records department during World War II. He married Esther, who was working at the commissary in 1948.

That same year, the couple moved from Seattle to Los Angeles and secured a small piece of land at what is now intersection of Interstate 10 and Francisquito Avenue in the suburb. 

The first In-N-Out store had no indoor seating. Harry sketched a 10-foot by 10-foot burger stand and installed a two-way speaker box connected to the kitchen for a drive-thru window. 

Harry cooked while Esther sliced onions, managed the books and cleaned up the kitchen. They shaped each patty by hand and butchered their own meat. 

Hamburgers were sold for 25 cents, and cheeseburgers for 30 cents. The restaurant sold two thousand burgers in its first month of operation.

By the time Harry died in 1976, In-N-Out had expanded to 18 locations in Southern California. His younger son, Rich Snyder, took over the business.

Throughout his life, Harry worked hard, Snyder recalled. But he struggled with fatherhood responsibilities after suffering abuse as a child and went on to abuse his own two children. 

'He had never been shown how to become an exemplary father, and his own childhood abuse had never been dealt with,' Snyder wrote.

'It's difficult to say exactly why he did what he did. Given his own abusive upbringing, I think my grandfather had never known anything different.' 

Eight years after Harry passed away the brothers began discussing their childhoods filled with physical and emotional pain. 

Snyder remembered the night when Rich showed up unexpectedly at her father's place, sat down and tearfully said, 'Guy, when we were kids, we were abused.' 

Harry, who had been locked in a closet and not fed as a child, had beaten the boys with a wooden ruler or yardstick until it broke, the book claimed.

His older son, Guy Snyder (Snyder's father), always endured the worst abuse and was sent to a military boarding school away from the family.

Esther and her son Rich founded the Child Abuse Foundation in 1984, which later became the In-N-Out Burger Foundation, to help child abuse victims and prevent others from suffering from abuse. 

Behind the rise of In-N-Out burger are struggles with drug and alcohol, a history of child abuse and shocking deaths of family members. Pictured from left to right: Guy, Esther, and Rich Snyder

Behind the rise of In-N-Out burger are struggles with drug and alcohol, a history of child abuse and shocking deaths of family members. Pictured from left to right: Guy, Esther, and Rich Snyder 

Harry, a child of Dutch immigrants, served as a clerk in the army's records department during World War II. He married Esther, who was working at the commissary in 1948

Harry, a child of Dutch immigrants, served as a clerk in the army's records department during World War II. He married Esther, who was working at the commissary in 1948

The first store on In-N-Out had no indoor seating. Harry sketched a ten-foot by ten-foot burger stand and installed a two-way speaker box connected to the kitchen for a drive-thru window

The first store on In-N-Out had no indoor seating. Harry sketched a ten-foot by ten-foot burger stand and installed a two-way speaker box connected to the kitchen for a drive-thru window

Throughout his life, Harry worked hard, Snyder recalled. But he struggled with fatherhood responsibilities and constantly abused his two kids because Harry himself was a victim of abuse

Throughout his life, Harry worked hard, Snyder recalled. But he struggled with fatherhood responsibilities and constantly abused his two kids because Harry himself was a victim of abuse

Despite serving as the vice president for several years, Guy spent considerable time away from the business, especially after a motorcycle accident at the age of 26. 

During a race in the desert when he was 26, a friend's motorcycle landed on top of Guy, crushing his arms when they flew over a cliff.

'Doctors fused his arm and shoulder back together the best they could. They reassembled his body with plates and screws. But Dad never healed completely,' Snyder wrote. 

Even more concerning was his overuse of prescription drugs that helped ease the pain. He was prescribed Vicodin and continued using a variety of opiates before and after Snyder was born.

Snyder remembered visiting her dad at an 'old hospital,' which she later found out was a rehab center, and once had to help him put a cigarette out when he fell asleep on the couch with it in his hand. 

Around the same time, Snyder learned that her dad was having an affair with another woman and caught him on the phone. Her parents divorced when she was just 12 years old. 

Rich, who was at the helm of the business during that time, struggled with drug problems too, including occasional cocaine use and an addiction to diet pills.

Tension between the brothers ensued as Rich tried to buy out Guy's shares and they disagreed over the company, which had expanded to 93 restaurants.  

The older son, Guy Snyder (Snyder's father), endured the worst abuse and was sent to a military boarding school away from the family

The older son, Guy Snyder (Snyder's father), endured the worst abuse and was sent to a military boarding school away from the family

Rich, who was at the helm of the business during that time, struggled with drug problems too, including occasional cocaine use and an addiction to diet pills

Rich, who was at the helm of the business during that time, struggled with drug problems too, including occasional cocaine use and an addiction to diet pills

After the opening of In-N-Out's 93rd location in Fresno, Rich was flying back home when the 10-passenger plane crashed with no survivors

After the opening of In-N-Out's 93rd location in Fresno, Rich was flying back home when the 10-passenger plane crashed with no survivors

Guy was fighting against his

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