Half of learners want lessons in EVs - and it's going to kill-off the manual ... trends now

Half of learners want lessons in EVs - and it's going to kill-off the manual ... trends now
Half of learners want lessons in EVs - and it's going to kill-off the manual ... trends now

Half of learners want lessons in EVs - and it's going to kill-off the manual ... trends now

The nation's future drivers have spoken, and they want to learn in electric cars. 

But, in an eco dilemma, the UK's shortage of instructors with electric vehicles is preventing people from transitioning to electric motoring, according to a new study by charging network, Gridserve.

As a result, it is likely to spell the end for the manual gearbox, with EVs almost always sold with single-speed transmissions that make the stick shift redundant.

Almost half of drivers would be likely to take lessons in an EV a new study from Gridserve finds, but only one in seven can find a local instructor offering lessons, making the switch to electric more of a challenge

Almost half of drivers would be likely to take lessons in an EV a new study from Gridserve finds, but only one in seven can find a local instructor offering lessons, making the switch to electric more of a challenge

WhatCar? has also reported a staggering 283 per cent increase in the popularity of automatic tests compared to a decade ago, sighting the transition to EVs as playing a big part

WhatCar? has also reported a staggering 283 per cent increase in the popularity of automatic tests compared to a decade ago, sighting the transition to EVs as playing a big part

There's disparity around the UK when it comes to finding a local EV instructor: London is the easiest place, followed by the West Midlands, while learner drivers in the East of England will struggle to get EV driving lessons

There's disparity around the UK when it comes to finding a local EV instructor: London is the easiest place, followed by the West Midlands, while learner drivers in the East of England will struggle to get EV driving lessons

The sustainable energy and EV leasing company has found that almost half of drivers (48 per cent) would be more likely to take driving lessons in an electric car.

Yet only one in seven those surveyed by Gridserve and One Poll can find a local instructor with a battery-powered model.

And whether you can find an EV instructor is a geographical luck of the draw.

Two in five (41 per cent) of learners in London are able to locate one, while only one in 10 in Yorkshire or the East of England can. 

The West Midlands also faired better than average with 23 per cent able to take local EV driving lessons.

A coinciding study from WhatCar? has reported a staggering 283 per cent increase in the popularity of automatic tests compared to a decade ago, sighting the transition to EVs as playing a key role in this shift.

EVs are primarily touted for their zero emissions credentials, but relaxing driving is another big pull.

Technically, electric cars don't have an automatic gearbox, but most people view them as autos.

Instead, they are commonly single-speed transmissions that delivery instant acceleration without the need of moving through a  number of ratios of gears.

Logically, many might think learning to drive an EV is much easier than a manual car, just as it's easier to drive an automatic.

However, driving test pass rates for automatic tests are lower than manuals.

In fact, 2021/22 records show the average pass rate for an auto test was around 41.7 per cent compared to an overall average success rate of 48.9 per cent in the same period.

The trend towards automatic

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