'Enough is enough!' Rishi Sunak vows Parliament will pass Rwanda Bill even if ... trends now

'Enough is enough!' Rishi Sunak vows Parliament will pass Rwanda Bill even if ... trends now
'Enough is enough!' Rishi Sunak vows Parliament will pass Rwanda Bill even if ... trends now

'Enough is enough!' Rishi Sunak vows Parliament will pass Rwanda Bill even if ... trends now

Rishi Sunak insisted 'enough is enough' today as he mounts an all-out bid to force the Rwanda plan through Parliament.

The PM told a press conference in Downing Street he is ready to make MPs and peers sit through the night to break an impasse on the crucial legislation.

He stressed the government is already poised to send the first flights carrying Channel migrants to the African state - saying an airfield is on standby and commercial charter planes have been booked.

But the premier admitted that deportations are unlikely to begin for another 10-12 weeks. That would mean July - later than his previous timetable of 'Spring', with Mr Sunak complaining that Labour has been 'blocking at every turn'.

'We will start the flights and we will stop the boats,' he said, suggesting there will be a 'regular rhythm' once the flights are up and running. 

The showdown comes after the House of Lords again refused to back down last week, passing more amendments to the Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill despite MPs repeatedly dismissing their objections.

That teed up a fourth round of 'ping-pong' - where legislation is batted between the two Houses until agreement is reached - which will begin in the Commons this afternoon.

In a round of interviews this morning, deputy Foreign Secretary Andrew Mitchell upped the ante by branding peers' resistance to sending asylum seekers to Rwanda 'patronising' and at times 'border on racism'. 

Meanwhile, a member of the House of Lords has suggested that the government is being 'disrespectful' to Jewish politicians by holding the vote as Passover begins. 

Rishi Sunak told a press conference in Downing Street he is ready to make MPs and peers sit through the night to break an impasse on the crucial legislation

Rishi Sunak told a press conference in Downing Street he is ready to make MPs and peers sit through the night to break an impasse on the crucial legislation

Mr Sunak is expected to deliver a stern message to peers this morning that his patience has run out, with his pledge to 'stop the boats' on the line. Pictured, migrants crossing the Channel last month

Mr Sunak is expected to deliver a stern message to peers this morning that his patience has run out, with his pledge to 'stop the boats' on the line. Pictured, migrants crossing the Channel last month

Rishi Sunak (pictured today) is set to face the media this morning as he mounts an all-out bid to force the Rwanda plan through Parliament

Rishi Sunak (pictured today) is set to face the media this morning as he mounts an all-out bid to force the Rwanda plan through Parliament

Mr Sunak said today: 'Enough is enough. No more prevarication, no more delay. Parliament will sit there tonight and vote no matter how late it goes. No ifs, no buts. These flights are going to Rwanda.'

Describing the plan as an 'indispensable deterrent so that we finally break the business model of the criminal gangs and save lives', Mr Sunak added: 'Starting from the moment that the Bill passes, we will begin the process of removing those identified for the first flight. We have prepared for this moment.'

Earlier, Mr Sunak held a meeting with senior ministers including deputy PM Oliver Dowden and Defence Secretary Grant Shapps.

The proposed law aims to send some asylum seekers on a one-way trip to Kigali in order to deter people from crossing the Channel in small boats.

The Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill and a new treaty are intended to prevent further legal challenges to the stalled asylum scheme after the Supreme Court ruled the plan was unlawful.

As well as compelling judges to regard the east African country as safe, it would give ministers the power to ignore emergency injunctions.

Despite MPs overturning previous changes by the upper chamber, last week peers renewed their demand that Rwanda cannot be treated as a safe country until an independent monitoring body has verified that protections contained in the treaty are implemented.

The provision would also allow the Secretary of State to effectively pull the plug on the scheme if the promised safeguards were not maintained.

The Lords also reinserted an exemption from removal for those who worked with the UK military or Government overseas, such as Afghan interpreters.

Mr Mitchell rejected the calls for Afghans to get special treatment.

He insisted there was a 'safe and legal route' available to them to come to the UK and urged the House of Lords to 'accept the will' of the House of Commons and the British people.

Mr Mitchell told Times Radio: 'We have an absolute obligation to Afghan interpreters, people who served the British Army, served our country during the Afghan crisis.

'But I'm pleased to say that thanks to the scheme that the Government set up, the Arap (Afghan relocations and assistance

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