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On the frontline with Nazi troops in North Africa

Fascinating photographs show Second World War German soldiers climbing trees, perching on a gun turret and posing with camels while serving in North Africa.

The series of black and white images, many of which have not been published before, give an insight into the men fighting on the other side of the six-year conflict. 

In one photograph, a shirtless soldier was laughing while he was sat on top of a camel next to his friend.

Meanwhile, eight German troops were seen climbing on top of a gun turret and posing for the camera in another picture. 

The North African Campaign started in 1940 and ended 1943 and took place in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco.

German general Erwin Rommel's army developed a formidable reputation during the three-year campaign in North Africa.   

The book, entitled Rommel in North Africa: Quest for the Nile (Images of War) by author David Mitchelhill Green, has brought together an incredible 450 photos of German troops from the front line of the North African conflict.

The images show soldiers sharing a drink, laughing and posing on the backs of camels and playing with local children. 

Development of the Italian cannone da 149/35 began in 1896. Lacking a recoil system, wooden ramps and wheel belts were used instead to absorb the recoil energy. Despite its age, in the absence of more modern large caliber pieces, 923 were still in service in June 1940. And in this photograph a group of soldiers posed for a picture after climbing on top of the turret

Development of the Italian cannone da 149/35 began in 1896. Lacking a recoil system, wooden ramps and wheel belts were used instead to absorb the recoil energy. Despite its age, in the absence of more modern large caliber pieces, 923 were still in service in June 1940. And in this photograph a group of soldiers posed for a picture after climbing on top of the turret

A group of soldiers were photographed enjoying themselves as two  men - one who wasn't wearing his shirt - hitched a ride on the back of a camel during their time in North Africa. The book's author, David Mitchelhill Green, said: 'My inspiration for this book arose from the enormous number of snapshots taken by ordinary German soldiers in North Africa'

A group of soldiers were photographed enjoying themselves as two  men - one who wasn't wearing his shirt - hitched a ride on the back of a camel during their time in North Africa. The book's author, David Mitchelhill Green, said: 'My inspiration for this book arose from the enormous number of snapshots taken by ordinary German soldiers in North Africa'

A German soldier was one of the men sent to North Africa between 1940 and 1943 and seemed to enjoy his surroundings when he stroked a camel

A soldier seemed to be having a laugh when he climbed a palm tree. A stylised palm tree with superimposed swastika became the iconic symbol of the Deutsches Afrikakorps on April 1, 1941

A German soldier was one of the men sent to North Africa between 1940 and 1943 and seemed to enjoy his surroundings when he stroked a camel (left). Meanwhile, another soldier seemed to be having a laugh when he climbed a palm tree (right). A stylised palm tree with superimposed swastika became the iconic symbol of the Deutsches Afrikakorps on April 1, 1941

A meeting of cultures. Hans-Joachim Schraepler described an incident when Hauptmann Hermann Aldinger, Rommel's aide, attempted to photograph an Arab woman: 'Although he approached her as if he was stalking a deer, it was impossible. The woman ran away, left her oxen at the well and was not seen again. Arabs came running, demanding cigarettes.'

A meeting of cultures. Hans-Joachim Schraepler described an incident when Hauptmann Hermann Aldinger, Rommel's aide, attempted to photograph an Arab woman: 'Although he approached her as if he was stalking a deer, it was impossible. The woman ran away, left her oxen at the well and was not seen again. Arabs came running, demanding cigarettes.'

A group of soldiers posed for a photograph on Christmas Eve in the desert. They had written Weihnachten - German for Christmas Eve - and the date and smiled for the picture. Hans von Luck said: 'Christmas 1942 arrived but we had no time to celebrate… deep in the desert, without a tree or a bush, and in the heat of the day, our thoughts turned to home'

A group of soldiers posed for a photograph on Christmas Eve in the desert. They had written Weihnachten - German for Christmas Eve - and the date and smiled for the picture. Hans von Luck said: 'Christmas 1942

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