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NCAA says college football star cant play over YouTube Ch

A college football star has been ruled ineligible to compete in the NCAA and lost his scholarship, after refusing to demonetize his YouTube channel.

Donald De La Haye, a placekicker at the University of Central Florida, was faced with a decision; cease making money off his YouTube channel, or don't play college football and lose his scholarship

De la Haye, who is going into his junior year, chose to lose his scholarship and stop playing. The UCF released a statement that they had tried to come to an agreement with De La Haye to allow him to continue to play as an NCAA athlete.

Donald De La Haye played football for the Knights at the University of Central Florida. He chose to give up his football career and scholarship to continue to monetize his YouTube channel 

Donald De La Haye played football for the Knights at the University of Central Florida. He chose to give up his football career and scholarship to continue to monetize his YouTube channel 

In an emotional YouTube post, De La Haye responded to the news that he was deemed ineligible to play over his refusal to back down on monetizing his YouTube channel 

In an emotional YouTube post, De La Haye responded to the news that he was deemed ineligible to play over his refusal to back down on monetizing his YouTube channel 

'The waiver, which was granted, stated De La Haye could maintain his eligibility and continue to monetize videos that did not reference his status as a student-athlete or depict his football skill or ability,' UCF said in their statement. 

'The waiver also allowed him to create videos that referenced his status as a student-athlete or depict his football skill or ability if they were posted to a non-monetized account.'

Many of De La Haye's videos referenced his football career at the school. He played in a all 13 of the Knights games this past season. Meanwhile his YouTube channel has over 90,000 subscribers.

De La Haye, a marketing major, spoke to SI Now in June about the rules that disallow NCAA athletes from profiting from their brand: 'I feel like it's about time for things to be changed.' 

'The times these rules were made weren't really up to par with

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