Osama bin Laden took revenge on US for breaking up family

Osama bin Laden targeted America when the United States made its pursuit of him 'personal' by breaking up his family, a new documentary claims.

The former leader of Al Qaeda became angry because his life was 'turned upside down' when he was forced to leave Sudan in 1996 due to pressure from the US.

According 'Road to 9/11', his only option was to return to Afghanistan and live in poverty where, stewing in his own rage, he wrote a 12 page declaration of war against America. 

His second wife left him and his eldest son returned to their native Saudi Arabia without him, later followed by another wife because she wasn't accustomed to the lifestyle.

The film, airing this week on the History Channel, suggests that for all his ideological hatred of the US, bin Laden was just as upset by the damage done to his own family.

Osama bin Laden targeted America when the United States made its pursuit of him 'personal' by breaking up his family, according to a new documentary Road to 9/11. The wealthy Al Qaeda leader was forced out of Sudan in 1996 due to US influence and lived in poverty in Afghanistan

Osama bin Laden targeted America when the United States made its pursuit of him 'personal' by breaking up his family, according to a new documentary Road to 9/11. The wealthy Al Qaeda leader was forced out of Sudan in 1996 due to US influence and lived in poverty in Afghanistan

The harsh life proved to be too much for his second wife and eldest son, who left for Saudi Arabia, with his first wife also leaving him shortly before the 9/11 attacks. Pictured: Bin Laden with one of his sons in 2001 

The harsh life proved to be too much for his second wife and eldest son, who left for Saudi Arabia, with his first wife also leaving him shortly before the 9/11 attacks. Pictured: Bin Laden with one of his sons in 2001 

Over nearly five hours, the three part mini series outlines in painstaking detail how the events which led to the September 11, 2001, attacks began at least a decade earlier.

Through 60 interviews with key players it also says that the warning signs were repeatedly missed - and multiple chances to kill bin Laden were not taken.

Road to 9/11 describes how by the mid 1990s bin Laden was trying to find a new target for his loyal mujahideen fighters who had stayed with him since the end of the war against the Soviets in Afghanistan in 1989.

At the time he was living in Sudan where virtually every major terrorist group had a base supported by the Islamist regime.

Bin Laden had an office, prestige, land for horses and was living a fairly comfortable life.

The US did not have enough evidence to indict him so the American authorities pressured Sudan to kick him out, and they caved in.

Bin Laden could not go Middle Eastern countries like Iraq, Egypt or even Qatar that was sympathetic to Islamic extremists.

Bin Laden was living a comfortable life before US officials pressured Sudan to kick him out. He went to Afghanistan, a country that barely had electricity. His son Omar bin Laden (left) left Afghanistan before 9/11 after falling out with his father over his descent into violent jihad

Bin Laden was living a comfortable life before US officials pressured Sudan to kick him out. He went to Afghanistan, a country that barely had electricity. His son Omar bin Laden (left) left Afghanistan before 9/11 after falling out with his father over his descent into violent jihad

Bin Laden, a man whose father was once one of the wealthiest men in Saudi Arabia, was eating stale bread, potato stew and splitting five fried eggs among 14 men. Pictured: The leader with one of his sons; he had about 20 children, 11 with his first wife Najwa

Bin Laden, a man whose father was once one of the wealthiest men in Saudi Arabia, was eating stale bread, potato stew and splitting five fried eggs among 14 men. Pictured: The leader with one of his sons; he had about 20 children, 11 with his first wife Najwa

His native Saudi Arabia was not an option as he had criticized its rulers so he had to go to Afghanistan.

According to author Steve Coll, who has written extensively about the bin Laden family, in May 1996 he moved Al Qaeda back to Afghanistan, a country that barely had electricity and was still shattered by the war with the Soviets.

A journalist who interviewed him was shocked to find a man whose father was once one of the wealthiest men in Saudi Arabia eating stale bread, potato stew and splitting five fried eggs among 14 men.

Coll tells the documentary that bin Laden was 'angry' after one of his wives left and his eldest son went to Saudi Arabia.

Coll says in the film: 'He blamed the US not only for all these sins of history and these manipulations of the Islamic world, but now it was personal.

'His own life had been turned upside down by American pursuit of him, American pressure that had forced him out of Sudan and to this broken country again.

'They sent him to Afghanistan thinking surely he will fade from the world scene but the first thing he did after he arrived was to climb up on a mountaintop and write a declaration of war on the United States'.

 In bin Laden's 12 page declaration, in which he vowed that America would be 'completely defeated', appears to have been motivated by personal scorn as much as ideology

 In bin Laden's 12 page declaration, in which he vowed that America would be 'completely defeated', appears to have been motivated by personal scorn as much as ideology

Two of the leader's wives left him as well as his son, which sparked bin Laden to take revenge on the US for the breakup of his family

Two of the leader's wives left him as well as his son, which sparked bin Laden to take revenge on the US for the breakup of his family

The 12 page declaration, in which he vowed that America would be 'completely defeated', appears to have been motivated by personal scorn as much as ideology, Coll says.

Examining his beliefs it makes sense; despite spending decades waging jihad, bin Laden often kept his family close to him on the front lines and valued their company immensely.

In total bin Laden had around 20 children and six wives.

It was his second wife, Khadijah Sharif, a university lecturer, who asked for a divorce when he moved back to Afghanistan because she did not want to live in hardship.

His eldest son was Abdallah bin Laden who is still alive today and living in Saudi Arabia.

Bin Laden's first wife was Syrian-born Najwa Ghanem who followed him back to Afghanistan but left days before 9/11 because she found their life in a mud hut in the wilderness too much.

Osama's son Hamzah (pictured) was detained in Iran before being freed in 2010. He is now attempting to lead Al Qaeda in his father's footsteps, and was declared an 'international terrorist' by America earlier this year

Osama's son Hamzah (pictured) was detained in Iran before being freed in 2010. He is

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