Financial assistance to help treat ash trees on private properties

Financial assistance to help treat ash trees on private properties
Financial assistance to help treat ash trees on private properties

Tree Canada, U-Haul and TELUS have joined forces to help fund the treatment of ash trees on private property in Beaconsfield.

Published on: September 12, 2017 | Last Updated: September 12, 2017 4:33 PM EDT

Tree Canada president Michael Rosen, left, Beaconsfield Mayor Georges Bourelle and U-Haul manager Martin Beaudin announce the funding of treatment of ash trees on private property. Rick Katigbak [email protected] +1 514 889-7132

A grant from Tree Canada, partnered with Telus and U-Haul, is helping Beaconsfield residents fight the encroaching emerald ash borer.

The ash borer has been devastating ash trees since it was first detected in North America in 2002. It was first detected on the island of Montreal in 2011. Municipalities throughout the West Island have launched treatment programs to rid yards and public property from the invasive beetle.

The $28,000 grant given to Beaconsfield will help defray the cost for homeowners who have requested treatment for their ash trees this year. The subsidy will cover 25 per cent of the cost of a property’s treatment. The average diameter of an ash tree in Beaconsfield this season was 52 cm, which translated into an average subsidy of $50 per tree.

During the 2017 season, 664 ash trees were treated on 292 private properties in Beaconsfield – an increase of 22 per cent over 2016. The injections which help prevent the beetle from burrowing into the tree to lay eggs are done in the early summer.

The grant is part of Tree Canada’s ongoing Operation ReLeaf, an initiative dedicated to helping communities restore urban tree canopies in the wake of natural disasters and infestations.

[email protected]

all right reserved for Montreal Gazette

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Iranian refugee could cost taxpayers millions to detain
NEXT Deputy PM forced to deny sleaze claims