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One third of British pubs has closed down since the 1970s

Britain has lost one third of its pubs since the 1970s, putting a vital part of national culture is under threat, campaigners have warned.

Figures from the Campaign for Real Ale (Camra) show the total has come down from 75,000 to 50,000 in around 40 years.

Camra blames rising costs, such as business rates, alongside higher beer taxes, which have driven up cost of a pint to more than £4 in some parts of country.

The total number of pubs in Britain has come down from 75,000 to 50,000 in around 40 years

The total number of pubs in Britain has come down from 75,000 to 50,000 in around 40 years

The editor of Camra's new Good Beer Guide, Roger Protz, is calling for action to support pubs, which are vital for the community and social life of the country.

'The British pub is unique - it is rooted in our island's history, dating from Roman and Saxon times,' he said.

'There is no better place for people to meet, enjoy a beer, strike up a conversation, make new friends and put the world to rights. Above all, the British pub, both ancient and modern, has character and an atmosphere that could never be replaced.'

The Guide reports that when Camra was formed in the early 1970s, Britain had 75,000 pubs. The number is now fewer than 50,000, with more beer drunk at home than in the pub.

While there are a number of contributing factors to the decline over the years, the Guide describes how the new business rates revaluation introduced in 2017 is the latest 'ticking time bomb' to devastate the sector.

It said that some of the increases, due to be phased in over a five-year period, are eye-watering.

For example, The Baum in Rochdale,

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