Home Guard posters showing how to use grenades uncovered

Fascinating training posters issued to the Home Guard teaching them how to build a bomb and handle a machine gun have resurfaced.

The diagrams belonged to 'Dad's Army' member Fred Hippisley, who toured villages in Lincolnshire during the Second World War to give tutorials to the local units.

The colourful posters include detailed diagrams of a Sten machine gun, a 14lbs anti-personnel bomb and a hand grenade. 

The intriguing posters were issued by the West Riding District Grenade Training organisation. 

A poster showing the different types of 22mm Spigot mortar, also known as the Blacker Bombard. The anti-tank bomb was provided to the Home Guard in case of a German invasion of British soil

A poster showing the different types of 22mm Spigot mortar, also known as the Blacker Bombard. The anti-tank bomb was provided to the Home Guard in case of a German invasion of British soil

A colourful poster explaining the different parts of a Sten machine gun. The Sten was a stable in the arsenal of British and Commonwealth soldiers during the war. They were notable at the time for their simple design and lost cost and maitenance

A colourful poster explaining the different parts of a Sten machine gun. The Sten was a stable in the arsenal of British and Commonwealth soldiers during the war. They were notable at the time for their simple design and lost cost and maitenance

The posters belonged to 'Dad's Army' member Fred Hippisley, who toured villages in Lincolnshire during the Second World War to give tutorials to the local units

A anti-personnel bomb is explained in one of Mr Hippisley's posters

The posters belonged to 'Dad's Army' member Fred Hippisley (left), who toured villages in Lincolnshire during the Second World War to give tutorials to the local units

Mr Hippisley was unable to enlist in the regular army because of his poor eyesight but he gave tutorials and patrolled the beaches on the lookout for German invaders.

The agricultural engineer from Boston, Lincs, died 20 years ago and the posters were passed on to his daughter Gwen Beck, 71, from Spalding, Lincs.

Recently, she was having a clear-out of her attic and stumbled across her father's 15 posters.

Her first inclination was to throw them into her recycling bin but her partner persuaded her to get an expert to take a closer look at them.

She decided to put the posters on the market and they have sold at auction for £620.

She said: 'My father was in the Home Guard because he couldn't enlist in the army due to failing a medical as a result of his eye sight.

The Dad's Army was immortalised in the TV comedy series (pictured) which portrayed the Home Guard as under-equipped and amateur

The Dad's Army was immortalised in the TV comedy series (pictured) which portrayed the Home Guard as under-equipped and amateur

A detailed drawing of the inner workings of a hand grenade

Another shows a tank grenade

A detailed drawing of the inner workings of a hand grenade (pictured left), along with a similar diagram of a tank grenade (right)

'He used to do demonstrations with guns in classrooms in the villages around Boston to show the various Home Guard units how to operate them.

'My father would

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