England Rugby star James Haskell slams Facebook

England rugby star James Haskell has slammed Facebook, saying the social media site 'couldn't have cared less' after fraudsters spread lies about him through fake stories.

The 32-year-old flanker has been the focus of a series of fake news reports, including one that said he died of a steroid overdose, and another accusing him of selling drugs.

Haskell first spoke out about the false reports last year, but again slammed Facebook after complaining about the 'horrific' events to the networking site.

England rugby star James Haskell has been the focus of a series of fake reports on Facebook, including one that said he died of a steroid overdose, and another accusing him of selling drugs

He first spoke out about the false reports last year, but again slammed Facebook after complaining about the 'horrific' events to the networking site

England rugby star James Haskell has been the focus of a series of fake reports on Facebook, including one that said he died of a steroid overdose, and another accusing him of selling drugs

'It's horrific. You laugh it off to start with and then you realise your group of friends, and all those who follow me or rugby, are seeing this stuff,' The Wasps and British Lions star told The Sunday Times.

He added: 'Unfortunately it appears that nobody checks anything any more. With social media, the attention span of people is just vaporising around us and everybody believes everything they see.

One story, which was shared by an account posing as ESPN, claimed to expose Haskell's 'dirty secret ... that he's been trying to keep under wraps for years'.

Another shared on social media was headlined 'James Haskell, gone at 31'.

In another incident, a firm selling fraudulent nutrition supplements used his name to market their product.

The company had paid Facebook to put the advertisements on to people's news feeds.

Some posts featuring Haskell were marked 'sponsored' or 'suggested posts', according to The Times.

Haskell asked Facebook to reveal who paid for them, but the company wouldn't do so, the rugby star said.

'They just said they're only a medium, they can't do that. You can't even pick up the phone [to call them], you have to fill out a form. They couldn't have cared less,' he said.

Earlier this month, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that the company is serious about preventing abuse and that its investments in keeping 'problematic content' off its social network will affect its profitability

Earlier this month, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that the company is serious about preventing abuse and that its investments in keeping 'problematic content' off its social network will affect its profitability

Haskell's solicitor, Matt Himsworth said that Facebook asked the rugby star to complain 'directly to the scam website', but it was a company based out of a Panama post office box.

Haskell said that Facebook should 'create an algorithm' to stop abuse, but accused the social networking giant of not wanting to do so.

'That stuff with Isis and celebrating death, they could stop that in two seconds,' he told The Times. 'I think the government has got to act about this if the companies

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