House where Rosa Parks sought refuge in Detroit goes on display

The house where Rosa Parks sought refuge in Detroit after fleeing the South is being briefly displayed in Rhode Island, after a trans-Atlantic journey and the abrupt cancellation of an exhibition that was supposed to feature it. 

To escape death threats, Parks moved to Detroit in 1957, two years after her defining act of defiance: refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger in Montgomery, Alabama.

She lived in the tiny house in Detroit with her brother and his family and struggled to make a new life for herself. The family says Parks lived there with 17 other relatives.

The house where Rosa Parks sought refuge in Detroit (above) after fleeing the South is being briefly displayed in Rhode Island this week after a trans-Atlantic journey

The house where Rosa Parks sought refuge in Detroit (above) after fleeing the South is being briefly displayed in Rhode Island this week after a trans-Atlantic journey

Rosa Parks lived in the home after moving to Detroit in 1957 - two years after her defining act of defiance: refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger in Montgomery, Alabama

Rosa Parks lived in the home after moving to Detroit in 1957 - two years after her defining act of defiance: refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger in Montgomery, Alabama

It was abandoned and slated for demolition after the financial crisis in 2008 and Detroit's dramatic decline. 

Parks' niece, Rhea McCauley, bought the home off a demolition list for $500 and then donated it to American artist Ryan Mendoza.

After unsuccessful efforts trying to persuade the city to help save the building, Mendoza in 2016 carefully dismantled it and moved it to Berlin, rebuilding it on the lot of his studio. 

Mendoza has now returned it to America where it was supposed to be the centerpiece of a weeks-long exhibition at Brown University this spring.

But the Ivy league school abruptly canceled the exhibition. 

It comes amid national conversation surrounding race, history and the value of certain monuments.  

The civil rights activist's niece called the cancellation a rejection of Parks and her legacy.

Volunteers in Providence, Rhode Island help reassemble the house where Rosa Parks sought refuge after fleeing the South in the 1950s

Volunteers in Providence, Rhode Island help reassemble the house where Rosa Parks sought refuge after fleeing the South in the 1950s

Artist Ryan Mendoza and his wife, Fabia Mendoza, put up siding on the house where Rosa Parks lived in Detroit in 1957

Artist Ryan Mendoza and his wife, Fabia Mendoza, put up siding on the house where Rosa Parks lived in Detroit in 1957

With the looming possibility that the house

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