Dead millionaire's daughter in battle with 'domestic servant' who 'tried to ...

Bok Soon Song, 72, tried to take advantage of dying John Williams when she turned up to his hospital with a registrar and attempted to marry the 66-year-old, a London court heard

Bok Soon Song, 72, tried to take advantage of dying John Williams when she turned up to his hospital with a registrar and attempted to marry the 66-year-old, a London court heard

A dead millionaire's daughter is locked in a bitter legal battle over her father's fortune with a 'domestic servant' who is accused of trying to marry the elderly man on his deathbed.

Former waitress Bok Soon Song, 72, tried to take advantage of dying John Williams when she turned up to his hospital with a registrar and attempted to marry the 66-year-old, a London court heard.

Miss Song staked her claim at his £1million Kensal Rise home by changing the locks and tried to collect £500,000 from his fortune after the engineer died in 2016, it was said.  

The Korean immigrant, who came to the UK in the 1980s and speaks little English, said she wasn't just Mr Williams' housekeeper, but also his lover, and wasn't added to his will before he died. 

But Mr Williams' daughter Deborah John-Woodruffe, 47, has blasted Miss Song's claims, saying she is nothing more than a 'live-in housekeeper' who took advantage of her dying father.

Miss Song is suing Mr Williams' estate as well as his three children, claiming she should be granted 'reasonable provision' from his fortune as his co-habiting partner of many years.

Mrs John-Woodruffe said the former waitress tried to tie the knot with her father while he was in hospital, only for the ill pensioner to send her and the registrar packing.

Miss Song claims to have effectively been Mr Williams' wife, but Mrs John-Woodruffe disputes her claim and is trying to have her thrown out of her father's four-bedroom home. 

Representing the daughter, barrister Barry Coulter said Miss Song had 'sought to marry' Mr Williams as he lay gravely ill in hospital, going as far as calling in a registrar to perform the ceremony.

'Mrs John-Woodruffe's case is that no part in this was played by the deceased and, when the party arrived, he sent them on their way,' he told Judge Marc Dight.

He questioned how, speaking very little English, Miss Song could have ever understood something so complex as a proposal of marriage.

Mr Williams' daughter Deborah John-Woodruffe said Miss Song is nothing more than a 'live-in housekeeper' who took advantage of her dying father. Pictured: The father and daughter

Mr Williams' daughter Deborah John-Woodruffe said Miss Song is nothing more than a 'live-in housekeeper' who took advantage of her dying father. Pictured: The father and daughter

Miss Song staked her claim at his £1million Kensal Rise (pictured) home by changing the locks and tried to collect £500,000 from his fortune after the engineer died in 2016, it was said

Miss Song staked her claim at his £1million Kensal Rise (pictured) home by changing the locks and tried to collect £500,000 from his fortune after the engineer died in 2016, it was said

Through an interpreter, Miss Song told the court Mr Williams proposed to her using simple words and gestures, and by pointing at words in a Korean-English phrase book.

But when the marriage was due to take place in the hospital, he decided to postpone it and sent the registrar away, she said.

The court heard Miss Song moved to the UK from South Korea in 1983 and worked as a waitress and later as a manager in restaurants.

She met Mr Williams, a Korean food lover and engineer, in the early 1990s through mutual friends and, she claims, began a long-term relationship with him.

Miss Song's

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