A century on, new poets follow in the footsteps of Wilfred Owen

Julia Read's (pictured) great uncle died near the end of the First World War

Julia Read's (pictured) great uncle died near the end of the First World War

'Battle for the Dawn' 

Julia Read, 68, from Wareham, Dorset, was inspired by her great uncle, who died aged 19 in the First World War.

You return, broken in body and mind – No will to face the challenge, of the life you left behind. 

But the demons that still haunt you are no longer real, 

Your resolve can overcome them, to let your spirit heal.

Accept the comfort offered, from those that you hold dear,

This is your finest battle, repel all thoughts of fear.

Remember those who can't come back, keep them by your side,

Take up the fight on their behalf, let them be your guide.

This path you tread is proven, take each step slow but sure,

One dawn you will awaken and be whole again once more.

Debbie Lawson (pictured), a nurse who has worked with traumatised veterans, had not written poetry since her youth

Debbie Lawson (pictured), a nurse who has worked with traumatised veterans, had not written poetry since her youth

'One for the Team' 

Debbie Lawson, 63, a nurse at Stoke Mandeville hospital near Aylesbury, has treated veterans with PTSD. Her husband was in the RAF and her son-in-law served in Afghanistan.

I keep seeing you mate, intact and laughing, holding up your baby to make us smile. 

I keep hearing you mate, joking, urging, 'come on lads keep together, don't step on the cracks it brings bad luck'. 

'Keep it tight boys, we'll be home by the footy season'.

We carried you home, silent and broken, you really took one for the team that day. 

Your dad stood with pride head high, don't cry, don't cry.

Lucy took the flag, a token for the broken. The baby will have it one day.

They'll go to the wall to see your name, a game, 'let's find daddy's name' but I keep seeing you mate, my shrink says you're not there, that makes us laugh doesn't it?

What do they know.

'Still Here' 

Julie Stamp, 58, a retired civil servant who stopped work to care for her disabled husband, was inspired by walks on the White Cliffs of Dover, near her home. 

Should I return to where it all began – to unknown shores, to cold unsettled seas, 

Or stand

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