Brit war heroes miss chance to revamp homes after Chelsea owner scraps £1bn ...

British service heroes face missing out on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of cash to redevelop their accommodation after Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich shelved his £1bn new stadium plans, MailOnline can reveal.

Veterans living in Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions - in the shadow of Stamford Bridge - were promised a windfall of £7000 each for the disturbance of having their homes demolished and rebuilt as part of the development.

Their new homes would also have afforded them a choice of floor coverings, fixtures, kitchens, curtains and paint colours. 

A range of fridge-freezers, oven and hobs dishwashers and washing machines were also to be installed in the updated homes. 

But the Russian billionaire's decision to scrap the stadium plans and ditch his visa application in the on-going row between Britain and his own country over the Salisbury nerve agent attack has almost certainly ended the veterans' hopes of new housing.

Army veteran Ian Camps, 63, who had completed seven tours of Northern Ireland said today he was 'disappointed'.  

British service heroes living in Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions (pictured)  - in the shadow of Stamford Bridge - on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of cash to redevelop their accommodation after Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich shelved his £1bn new stadium plans

British service heroes living in Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions (pictured)  - in the shadow of Stamford Bridge - on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of cash to redevelop their accommodation after Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich shelved his £1bn new stadium plans

Chelsea owner Abramovich has scrapped £1bn plans to renovate the club's stadium (pictured) in the on-going row between Britain and his own country over the Salisbury nerve agent attack

Chelsea owner Abramovich has scrapped £1bn plans to renovate the club's stadium (pictured) in the on-going row between Britain and his own country over the Salisbury nerve agent attack

Army veteran Ian Camps, 63 (pictured) who had completed seven tours of Northern Ireland said today he was 'disappointed' by the decision to scrap the plans because it meant Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions would miss out on the cash needed to modernise the accommodation

Army veteran Ian Camps, 63 (pictured) who had completed seven tours of Northern Ireland said today he was 'disappointed' by the decision to scrap the plans because it meant Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions would miss out on the cash needed to modernise the accommodation

Abramovich, 51, who transformed Chelsea after he bought the club for £140million in 2003, vetoed the stadium revamp yesterday after the Government failed to grant him a UK visa 

Abramovich, 51, who transformed Chelsea after he bought the club for £140million in 2003, vetoed the stadium revamp yesterday after the Government failed to grant him a UK visa 

'This is a big blow. The money would have helped take Stoll Mansions into the 21st and 22nd centuries,' he said.

'It is an old place and more than 100 years old and needs more than just a lick of paint.

'I was due to get a spanking new kitchen with state-of-the art facilities and now I don't know what is going to happen. 

'It's a sad day as it would have meant a big improvement for us all. I live and breathe this place and I also have PTSD.' 

The flats, built 102 years ago, where retired service personnel live and receive treatment for PTSD, overlook the club's main entrance at Britannia Gate. The accommodation was going to be moved further west to allow a new stand.

The new stand would have helped add around 20,000 extra seats taking the capacity to 63,000 and also led to 300 new veterans' homes.

But a Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions' spokeswoman said today: 'We are examining what happens next. It is too early for us to know.' 

Stoll describes itself as 'a small charity with very small financial reserves' which relies on fundraising to deliver its services every year.

The Russian's money would also have been spread around Britain to help other veteran organisations as well as helped fund a high-tech new housing complex on the 1916-built site. 

Veterans had been promised that no rent increases would be levied on them to help pay for the redevelopment and the work would not be completed until 2021.  

Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions, built 102 years ago, where retired service personnel live and receive treatment for PTSD, overlook the club's main entrance at Britannia Gate (pictured)

Sir Oswald Stoll Mansions, built 102 years ago, where retired service personnel live and receive treatment for PTSD,

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