: Supreme Court confirmation will be quick if I pick right person

President Donald said Sunday the confirmation process for his Supreme Court pick will go 'very quickly' as he will 'pick the right person.'

He offered no clue as to who that right person may be, however, as Democrats have complained Republicans should not hold hearings in an election year if they would not do so in 2016 for then-President Barack Obama's nominee. 

The president acknowledged the confirmation process could get contentious.

'It's probably going to be vicious because the other side, all they can do obstruct and resist,' he told 'Sunday Morning Futures' on Fox News.

President Trump acknowledged the confirmation process could get contentious but said it will go quickly if he picks the right person

President  acknowledged the confirmation process could get contentious but said it will go quickly if he picks the right person

Justices of the US Supreme Court: Seated (L-R): Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice of the US John G. Roberts, Associate Justices Clarence Thomas and Stephen Breyer. Standing (L-R): Associate Justices Elena Kagan, Samuel Alito Jr., Sonia Sotomayor and Neil Gorsuch.

Justices of the US Supreme Court: Seated (L-R): Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice of the US John G. Roberts, Associate Justices Clarence Thomas and Stephen Breyer. Standing (L-R): Associate Justices Elena Kagan, Samuel Alito Jr., Sonia Sotomayor and Neil Gorsuch.

'They're going to try very hard, but I think it's going to go actually very quickly if I pick the right person,' he added. 

But the confirmation of 's first Supreme Court pick, Neil Gorsuch, went smoothly and was seen as one of the few early successes of the administration. 

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced Wednesday he would retire, which many see as a chance for to shape the court in a more conservative direction. 

The president has indicated he understands the heavy weight his pick will carry on the future laws of the country.

'Honestly, if the Democrats would have won the election, first of all, you would have had a lot different – if you look at the last four decisions in the Supreme Court at 5-4, they would have all been reversed,' he said on Fox News.

'As president I mean obviously outside of war and peace – the biggest decision you can make is the selection of a Supreme Court justice,' he added.

The president has a list of 25 names he is working off of to pick Kennedy's replacement and he said on Friday that he narrowed those options down to five, including two women.

'Everybody on that list is outstanding, but I'm going to pick somebody's who's outstanding,' he said on Fox News.

has said he'll name a nominee on July 9 - the day before he leaves on a trip to Europe.

The Washington Post reported on Sunday that has three qualities he's looking for in a member of the bench.

He wants 'extraordinarily well qualified' nominee with a superlative résumé and name-brand degrees.

He also wants his nominee be 'not weak,' meaning someone with independent judgment and the courage to buck 'the political and social fashions of the day,' an adviser to the president on the issue told the newspaper.

Finally, wants a nominee who will 'interpret the Constitution the way the framers meant it to be.'

His short list is said to include: Thomas Hardiman, a federal appeals court judge in Pittsburgh who was a finalist in the last search; U.S. Appeals Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett of Indiana; U.S. Circuit Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh of Maryland, a former Kennedy law clerk; U.S. Circuit Judge Raymond Kethledge of Michigan, who was a finalist in the last search; and U.S. Appeals Court Judge Amul Thapar of Kentucky.

Democrats, however, are trying to slow down the process.

A vote before the election would put the red-state Democrats - senators up for reelection in states won in 2016 - under intense pressure: a party's liberal base that wants them to vote no versus a majority of constituents that supported the president. 

Plus if the Democrats were to gain Senate seats in the 2018 election that could also hold up the confirmation process.

'I would love that because I want to make sure that we have enough time,' Sen. Maria Cantwell, a Democrat from Washington state, said on 'Meet

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