Pauses in speech may indicate Alzheimer’s disease

At-risk people are less able to express ideas and speak with reduced 'fluency' They also used words such as 'it' or 'they' rather than specific names for things People with a family history of the disease speak in shorter sentences Experts believe these are all indicators that the brain is struggling with its 'load' In healthy people not at-risk of the condition, verbal skills are maintained

By Alexandra Thompson Health Reporter For Mailonline

Published: 15:12 BST, 17 July 2017 | Updated: 15:12 BST, 17 July 2017

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Pauses in speech and taking longer to talk may be early signs of mental decline, new research reveals.

People with a family history of Alzheimer's disease who are at-risk of developing the condition are less able to express their ideas and have reduced 'fluency' when speaking, a study found.

They also use words such as 'it' or 'they' rather than specific names for things and speak in shorter sentences, the research adds. 

Julie Liss, a speech expert at Arizona State University, who was not involved in the study, said: 'Those are all indicators of struggling with that computational load that the brain has to conduct'

Around 47 million people worldwide have dementia, with Alzheimer's disease being the most common form of the condition.

Pauses in speech may be an early sign of Alzheimer's-associated mental decline (stock)

Pauses in speech may be an early sign of Alzheimer's-associated mental decline (stock)

A COMPOUND IN STRAWBERRIES MAY PREVENT AGE-RELATED MENTAL DECLINE 

Strawberries could help prevent age-related mental decline, research suggested earlier this month.

A compound in the fruit, known as fisetin, eases cognitive deterioration and inflammation in mice, a study found.

Mice not treated

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