Two more die of mosquito-borne EEE virus in Michigan

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Two more die of mosquito-borne EEE virus in Michigan as cases of the disease that kills 30% of victims reach unprecedented levels in the US Michigan health officials confirmed Tuesday that another four people have the mosquito-borne virus Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) Two of those have died, officials said   One-third of patients with EEE die, but it usually only affects 5-10 people a year This year, Michigan, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Jersey have all seen three or more cases already  No treatments have been discovered, so doctors can only provide supportive therapy 

By Natalie Rahhal Deputy Health Editor For Dailymail.com

Published: 18:18 BST, 18 September 2019 | Updated: 18:36 BST, 18 September 2019

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Two more people have died of the surging mosquito-borne virus, Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) in Michigan and another two cases have been confirmed, the state health department said Tuesday.  

That brings Michigan's EEE death toll to three so far this year, according to its health department's weekly update. 

In a typical year, there are only between five and 10 cases of EEE, an untreatable virus that can cause potentially life-threatening brain swelling, in the entire US. 

But, likely fueled by rising temperatures and patterns in bird migrations, there have already been seven human cases in Michigan, 10 in New Jersey, three in Rhode Island, and eight in Massachusetts, where two have died. 

Mosquitoes carry Eastern equine encephalitis, a virus that kills 30% of people that contract it, including two people whose deaths were confirmed this week in Michigan

Mosquitoes carry Eastern equine encephalitis, a virus that kills 30% of people that contract it, including two people whose deaths were confirmed this week in Michigan 

Cases are more common on the East Coast of the US, mostly concentrated in Florida.  

EEE thrives in warm swampy areas where standing water provides plentiful food and a fertile breeding ground.  

So mosquitoes proliferate in swampy Florida, bite the birds that spend their winters there, which

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