Poorly patient developed resistance to last-ditch antibiotic for killer ...

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A toddler’s potentially-deadly infection became resistant to a last-ditch antibiotic in just three weeks, doctors have warned.

The unnamed three-year-old had pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a germ already strong enough to fight off many life-saving drugs.

But, over the space of just 22 days, the bacteria developed resistance to ceftolozane-tazobactam – the drug given to clear the bug.

French doctors who treated the infant discovered his strain of P aeruginosa carried a mutation that made it stronger against the type of antibiotic.

The University Paris-Saclay experts have warned the mutation – called G183D – can ‘rapidly’ cause resistance during treatment.

The unnamed three-year-old had pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. But, over the space of just 22 days, the bacteria developed resistance to ceftolozane-tazobactam (branded as Zerbaxa) – the drug given to clear the bug

The unnamed three-year-old had pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. But, over the space of just 22 days, the bacteria developed resistance to ceftolozane-tazobactam (branded as Zerbaxa) – the drug given to clear the bug

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is deemed to be one of the biggest threats facing humanity, alongside climate change and terrorism.

Antibiotics have been doled out unnecessarily by GPs and hospital staff for decades, fueling once harmless bacteria to become superbugs.

Around 700,000 people already die yearly due to drug-resistant infections across the world. It is estimated the annual toll will reach 10million by 2050. 

Dr Leurent Dortet and colleagues published their warning of the newly discovered mutation in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

Dr Dortet said: ‘Our results demonstrated that resistance to this novel molecule [ceftolozane-tazobactam] can occur rapidly during treatment.’

He noted that at the time they discovered the mutation, the antibiotic – branded as Zerbaxa – had only been in clinical use for a couple of years.

The three-year-old had biliary atresia, a rare disease in which one or more of the liver's bile ducts are narrow, blocked or missing.

They caught pneumonia from an 'extremely drug resistant' strain of P. aeruginosa following a second liver transplant.

French doctors who treated the infant discovered his strain of P aeruginosa carried a mutation that made it stronger against the type of antibiotic

French doctors who treated the infant discovered his strain of P aeruginosa carried a mutation that made it stronger against the type of antibiotic

Six months later, in March 2016, the patient was given ceftolozane-tazobactam to treat a follow-up infection.

Samples of the bacteria taken 22 days later showed one isolate that was resistant - which hadn't been seen by the doctors before. 

Doctors did not specify what happened to the boy. 

Dr Dortet and his team found the mutation responsible for causing the resistance by analysing the genes of the

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